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Innsdale Tank Cathodic Protection Submittalto or of Drinking Water System Components, Additives and Treatment Units UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES INC. An independent, not- for - profit organization testing for public safety CORRPRO WATERWORKS MANUFACTURE REFERENCE No. MH17837 COMPANY NAME 1055 West Smith Road ADDRESS CERTIFICATE No. Medina OH 44256 CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE The above company is qualified under the Classification and Follow -up Service of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. to furnish Drinking Water Treatment Components Classified with respect to Standard ANSI/NSF 61. The above mentioned company is therefore authorized to issue this Certificate for the bulls shipment of material described below as it's representation that such material is manufactured in compliance with requirements established by Underwriters Laboratories Inc. for this class of product. This Certificate does not indicate proper application or use of the material and does not apply to other material, which may be used at the location specified. -- SEE U L PLUMBING AND ASSOCIATED PRODUCTS DIRECTORY -- TRADE DESIGNATION: CATEGORY Mechanical Devices USE LEVEL: 25,000 Gallon Tanks or Larger WATERQUALITY DRINKING WATER SYSTEM COMPONENTS ANSI/ NSF 61 7N53 Date of Issuance of Certificate Date Material Supplied: Carrier: Waterworks City /State Description of Container: Corrpro Waterworks Crew Bill of Lading No Shipped To: City /State= Signature of Authorized Person: 0 NO. I DATE I BY CORRPRO SYSTEM NO. 1 1 • 10 AWG RHW CABLE 10 AWG RHW CABLE CABLE THERS TION PIPE L. IL REVISION z �: :�i L-3 o ° poo C� rtoo �i oL-n U O DRAWN BY S.C. DESIGNED BY S.C. DATE 5 -13 -11 t-- U O Q O U U = Cn U � � O � Q ' I-- z V7 z I w . Q J • O C. Q � J Q L • J wz= U Q CL cn O 2 LA - Ln Ln l J N W O 5 H.W.L. VA CHORD MOUNTING :T TO BE WELDED i 15" ® III H TANK 21 -1/4" J 70" t f FRONT VIEW 4TING DETAIL 22' -C 4 ACCORDANCE WITH PROJECT SPECIFICATION CORRPRO SYSTEM NO. 10119 • TI ON )PIPE AIL NO. I DATE I BY I REVISION - 3/8" DIA. STEEL ROD 60° — 22' -0 "R 1 `\ TOP VIEW WELD DETAIL DRAWN BY S.C. DESIGNED BY S.C. DATE 5 -13 -11 SCALE NONE SHEET 2 OF 2 DWG. 10119 -2 N U < O U U (! ) = Q U U � Q o O E _ Q (¢ F LLLJ o Q J ® o Q. J Qzo 'Q wz= U �O C/") O 2 ` V ` , JJ - L1. O O N n O LL Wo Lu Q Q z 0 O° oC ,z rvo cn ce :�i O `n U C) O OOSIONV213 NVS • VIHdl30VlfHd 1999'SZL'0�T HO `VNI03VY 08 H11YYS iN SSOL AID MOHVINO • SNV3180 M3N • NOIsnoH S>I'dOM'd3lVAA ONdIdHOD 09VOIHO • V1NVl1V • ONV13A31O oil E ww J (n (n w W J < �ik�w III= w N N S z W I— W LL- Q LLI W U Q Z W G z ffi g b 6 F5 s >r H U) I— n Z CU U O W 0 U) V7 Z OD O r N a m 6 m - T LO r- � z I - O i ~ U F OW cn U } r-) — (n O Q U 0 z HMWPE Direct Burial Cable Multi - Purpose Cathodic Protection Cable Selecting the right cable for connecting anodes, - power supplies, and structures is an important pert of any cathodic protection design. Coirpro makes this selection process easy by offering a cable manufactured specifically for the cathodic protection industry. It is composed of copper wire, which is covered by high- molecular- weight polyethylene (HMWPE). The copper wire is stranded and annealed to permit extra flexibility. Because the polyethylene on the cable is approximately twice as thick as on conventional HMWPE wire, it serves as both electrical insulator and mechanical cover for the conductor. This provides Corrpro's cathodic protection cable with outstanding dielectric strength and moisture resistance. During installation, the' cable can withstand considerable mechanical abuse without risk of damage to the copper electrical conductor. The polyethylene cover is also chemically resistant, and protects against most organic and inorganic substances. Corrpro's HMWPE cable is manufactured according to strict quality control standards. The polyethylene coating is made to meet American Society for Testing Materials Standard D -1248 for plastic molding and extruded materials. In addition, routine tests are performed to ensure that the cable possesses certain mechanical and electrical properties. Typical Applications HMWPE cable is offered in a variety of sizes. It can be used as a header cable on cathodic ' protection systems, or to make anode -lead or negative -return connections. The thick polyethylene cover permits direct burial of the cable in native soils or submersion in freshwater. The cable exhibits superior flexibility, and can be bent without risk of notch propagation. It is not recommended for use in environments containing chlorine, hydrochloric acid, or petroleum hydrocarbons. � COMPAI�f €S 11�[G for &ery Corner d .YpWWorfd.. 1090 Enterprise Drive / Medina, OH 44256 Tel: 1- 330 - 723 -5082 /Fax: 1- 330 - 723 -0694 littp: // vw,w.carrpro.com HMWPE Direct Burial Cable Ordering Procedure Corrpro's HMWPE cable is readily stocked in a range of wire sizes, and in available for immediate shipping. To order the right cable for your particular application, indicate that you need Con HMWPE cable, and specify the lineal feet and wire size desired. An example is provided to help illustrate this process. Ordering Procedure Example ITEM EXAMPLE Quantity (Lineal Feet) 2, 000 ft. Wire Size #4 AWG Wire Type HMWPE MIX C ORO C�MPAN {ES - INC For Every Corner of World 1090 Enterprise Drive / Medina, OH 44256 Teh• 1- 330- 723 -5082 /Fax: 1- 330 - 723 -0694 littp: / /wNvNv.corTpro.com COPPER CONDUCTORS HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT POLYETHYLENE HMWPE Order Information WIRE SIZE AWG (MW) NUMBERI OF STRANDS INSULATION I THICKNESS in. (MM) NOMINAL O.D.' in. (MM) 14 (2.5 ) 7 0.11 (2.794 ) 0.299 7.59) 12 (4) 7 0.11 (2.794) 0.31 (7.87) 10 (6) 7 0.11 (2.794) 0.34 (8.64) 8 (10) 7 0.11 (2.794) 0.36 (9.14) 6 (1 7 0.11 (2.794 ) 0.41 (10.41) 4 (25) 7 0.11 (2.794) 0.46 (11.68) 2 '(35) 7 0.11 (2.794) 0.52 (13.21) 1 (45) 19 0.125 (3.175) 0.59 (14.99) 1/0 (50) 19 0.125 (3.175 ) 0.63 (16.00) 2/0 (70) 19 0.125 (3.175 ) 0.67 (17.02) 410 (120 ) 19 - 0.125 (3.175) 0.78 (19.81) MIX C ORO C�MPAN {ES - INC For Every Corner of World 1090 Enterprise Drive / Medina, OH 44256 Teh• 1- 330- 723 -5082 /Fax: 1- 330 - 723 -0694 littp: / /wNvNv.corTpro.com Permanent Reference Cell For Accurate Readings in Fresh Water Environments Including Water Tanks & Clarifiers Routine monitoring is an important part of any cathodic protection maintenance program. To simplify this testing procedure, different types of permanent reference cells can be used. For structures located in fresh water areas, Conpro offers the Permacell 801 copper /copper sulfate cell. The cell is made using a 99.99% pure copper coiled element, which is surrounded by a supersaturated solution of copper sulfate. To ensure a low - resistance connection, a lead wire is soldered and mechanically bonded to the copper element. This electrical junction is then encapsulated by a moisture - resistant material for a truly sealed connection. Electrical contact to the electrolyte is accomplished through a filtering plug at the end of the reference electrode. The plug allows accurate potential measurements to be obtained while preventing cell contamination. In order for a reference to be effective, it must remain electrically stable over time. Corrpro's 801 reference cell delivers unsurpassed stability due to strict quality control procedures implemented during the manufacturing process. The cell is constructed in a controlled environment, totally free of contaminants. The various components used in the cell are also purified. Deionized water is used to create the supersaturated solution of copper sulfate, and the copper element is treated with a special cleansing agent before it is installed into the cell's plastic housing. Each cell is also tested for resistance and electrical potential, and the Typical Applications The Permacell 801 Js ideal for use in cathodic protection systems operated in fresh water environments. This includes elevated water storage tanks, clarifiers, traveling screens, pasteurizers, locks, dams, and fresh water dock structures. The cell can be operated in temperatures of up to 135 °F, but should not be used in waters containing high concentrations of chloride ions. Reference cell is available as NSF 61 classified for potable water. Ore Xt CORMM" COMPANIES INC Preserve and Sustain Global Assets & Infrastructure Waterworks Division-Sales and Operations OHIO GEORGIA ARIZONA 1055 W. Smith Road 581 Sigman Road, Suite 300 5643 N. 52nd Avenue Medina, Ohio 44256 Conyers, Georgia 30012 Glendale, Arizona 85301 Phone: 330.725.6681 Phone: 770.761.5400 Phone: 602.269.7641 Fax: 330.723.6065 Fax: 770.761.5410 Fax: 623.842.9697 www.corrpro.com National Service Center: 800.443.3516 values obtained are recorded and marked on shipping tags attached to the cells. These extra quality steps give the Permacell 801 a 10 -year design life and the ability to maintain an electrical potential of within ±5 millivolts. ODSIONVaJ NVS • VlHdl34VIIHd 1899'9. HO 'VNI03n 08 H11AS A 9901 AID V;NO14VIYO • SNY31YO M3N- • NOISnOH S>I"dOAA"d3-LVM OldidldUOD O9VOIHJ • VlNVUV • 0NMA31.0 CU c3 vi to z "4 06 Z CL n 0 Z) co J V) Ld > z LLJ D �7< CL U.j z CL R Z LU a. m a. ui 03 0 V) V) w w C) a a- ce w In 0 o CL Ld > z LLJ z 0 I C) LLI I 0 Cr) 0 IE C) Ld 0 0 C) L � _j 0 W 00 LLJ CL CL C) Z LLJ w Ld LL. Ld w O W, ui 03 V) LLJ zw 0 :5 VU LU ZO Lq Zu- 0 oz LLJ m W WX IL w w fL 0 0 C.) (n z ow 0�4 Wz (L— MW —3: z 0 I C) LLI I 0 Cr) 0 IE C) Ld 0 0 C) L � _j 0 W 00 LLJ CL CL C) Z LLJ w Ld LL. Ld w Specification: RHW -2 /USE -2 Issue Date: 04/23/09 K K T) Supersedes: 07/20/07 m M Kris -Tech Wire Co. 921 Seneca St. • PO Box 4377 • Rome, NY 13442 -4377 USA Telephone 315 - 339 -5268 • Fax 315 - 339 -5277 WWW.KRISTECHWIRE.COM 1.0 Scope: This specification describes single conductor crosslinked polyethylene (XLP or XLPE) Type RHW -2 and USE -2 for use at 600 volts or less: It is approved per the NEC for DIRECT BURIAL, general purpose lighting, and power applications at a maximum continuous operating temperature of 90 degrees C in wet and dry locations. 2.0 Applicable Standards: 2.1 ASTM B -1, B -3, and B -8 for copper conductors. 2.2 ICEA S- 95- 658 /NEMA WC70, ICEA S- 66- 524 /NEMA WC7 Cross Linked Polyethylene Insulated Wire &Cable, UL 854 for Service Entrance Cables (incl. Para. 854 -38.7 for 300 hr. sunlight resistance) and UL 44 for Thermoset Insulated Wires & Cables, Fed Spec J- C -30B, FAA L -824 Type C 600V 3.0 Conductors: The single copper conductors shall be solid or stranded annealed or hard uncoated copper per UL83 and ASTM requirements. 4.0 Insulation: The conductor shall be insulated with XLP as specified and applied tightly to the conductor in a concentric manner. These conductors are "Oil and Gasoline Resistant II ". All black insulation is rated and identified "Sunlight Resistant ". The minimum at any point shall not be less than 90% of the specified average thickness in compliance with UL 44. 5.0 Identification: The wire shall be identified in compliance with UL requirements by surface marking indicating the manufacturer, conductor size, voltage rating, UL symbol, and type designation. 6.0 Packaging: Standard length spools have 500 or 2500 feet. Custom lengths are available. 7.0 Testing: The wire shall be continuously spark tested at 7500 Volts DC. Other electrical and mechanical tests shall be in accordance with UL 44, UL 854 and UL 1581. AWG Standard Number of Strands Extra Flexible Stranding Insulation Thickness Mils Nominal Overall Diameter — Inches (standard strands) Approx. Shipping Wgt. (Lbs. /Mft.) 14 Solid or 7 41 45 0.1670.17" 21 12 Solid or 7 65 45 0.18 "/0.19" 30 10 Solid or 7 37 or 105 45 0.20 "70.21" 44 8 7 1, 19, 133 60 0.27" 70 6 7 1, 19, 133 60 0.31 " 106 4 7 1, 19, 133 60 0.35" 161 2 7 19, 1.33' 60 0.41" 246 1 19 133 80 0.49" 318 1/0 19 133 80 0.53" 389 Non - standard STRANDING, COLORS, and CUSTOM PACKAGING are available by quotation. e- maikrhw -use -2 Page 1 of 1 4/23/2009 LIDAwire anodes are copper titanium wire with a mixed metal oxide coating. The mixed metal oxide is a crystalline, electrically conductive coating that activates the titanium and enables it to function as . an anode. LIDAwire anodes are manufactured in two diameters, 1.5 millimeter and 3.0 millimeter. When applied on titanium the coating has an extremely lovit consumption rate measured in terms of milligrams per year. As a result of this low consumption rate, the wire diameter remains nearly constant during the life of the anode. The low consumption rate of the mixed metal oxide coating at the recommended operating current densities result in projected`anode lifetimes from 15 to 20 years. Longer or shorter lifetimes may be obtained by varying the current output per foot per wire. Anode Coating —The coating used on wire is suitable for most cathodic protection applications, but output varies with application. LIDA mixed metal oxide coating demonstrates a very high chemical stability, even in environments with very low pH values. Unlike other impressed current anodes, the LIDA® coating is not affected by the generation of chlorine. Lead Wire Connection — Atypical connection between the LIDA wire anode and a header cable, have been used successfully in canistered `anodes h since 1987. Applications �' ► Canistered anodes ► Continuous horizontal. groundbeds ► Discontinuous horizontal groundbeds ► Shallow vertical groundbeds �` ► Deep anode groundbeds ► Above ground storage tanks ► Underground storage tanks Fresh water Flexibility of Use — LIDAwire anodes can be used in a wide variety of cathodic protection applications. Their lightweight and malleability allow forming to complex configurations. The copper core provides high conductivity resulting in better current distribution along the entire length of the wire. 26 0 2008 Corrpro Companies Inc. •A/I Rights Reserved ► Electrical cable shielding ► Water storage tanks ► Water treatment equipment Resistivity Versus Length — Proper current distribution . is an important factor in the design and proper use of an anode wire for each application. For example, if a wire voltage drop of 10% or less is desired for proper current distribution in 1000 ohm -cm water, anode segments of 50 feet should not be exceeded between electrical connections to a header cable with the 1.5 mm diameter wire. By comparison, use of the 3.0 mm diameter wire will permit the use of 110 foot segments, while still allowing the desired 10% voltage drop. As with all electrical conductors, the operating temperature of the wire effects the resistance. The table below, shows this effect by assuming the wire will operate at the temperature of the surrounding electrolyte. The change in resistivity also changes the maximum ampacity of the wire. Savings — In many cases, LIDA mixed metal oxide wire anodes offer savings over competitive anodes on an installed cost basis. This is possible by balancing the high current density capability of mixed metal oxide coatings and the ability to tailor to desired lifetimes. MIXED METAL OXIDE ANODES De Nora LIDAG Wire Anodes �#arc� Anode Nominal Dimensions Nom Wire D Diameter T Current Rating Copper A Active Surface W Weight 0 Length m'l mm i in mm i mm ft % by % m % by f ft /ft of m /m of I Special g/m 0.062 1.5 1000 Wt V 304.8 Wt V 20 Standard 0.062 1.5 1000 304.8 100 XL 0.062 1.5 1000 304.8 200 'Bases on 20 year design life in calcined petroleum grade coke i Nom Wire D Diameter T Titanium C Copper A Active Surface W Weight Size T To A Area mm i inches m mm i inches % % by % % by % % by % % by f ft /ft of m /m of I Ibs /ft g g/m Wt V Vol W Wt V Vol l length length 1.5 0,062 +0.15 +0.007 36.1 52.7 Vol - -0.0 - 0.0000 3.0 .0.118 +0.28 0.010 17.1 29.0 82.9 71.0 0.033 1.0E -02 0,042 82.5 -0.00 -0.000 GIN CLADDING Braided Products, LLC One Gladding Street South Otselic, NY 13155 315- 653 -7211 (fax 4492) Gladding Part Number #10ESTYBX1000 Specification sheet vladding's double braided polyester ropes combine high - tenacity polyester yarns into a unique firm round braided rope. The unique construction first twists the yarns in opposite directions and then braids those twisted strands into a stable braided core. Next, the braided core is inserted inside a braided sleeve /jacket made from the same twisted yarns. This twisting process adds stability to the rope resulting in a rope that will not twist and kink. The twisted yarns in both the core and sleeve add excellent abrasion resistance because the twisted fibers aligned with the axis of the rope. This unique rope combines the 100% polyester yarns into a rope that features high strength, low stretch, easy splicing, and excellent abrasion resistance. Raw Material (sleeve and core) 100% Polyester Cover Braid Sleeve 12 PPI ( per 4.5irnn) Core Braid 100% polyester 8e Diameter 5/16" Circumference 1" Approx weight per 100 ft. 3.5 Approx average Breaking Strength in pounds 3,270 Braided construction Non rotating balanced braid Specific Gravity 1.38 82 -A Series Power Cable Splice Kit Instructions LISTED 981-11 wire connector system for use with underground conductors. 1.0 Applications: Designed for use in weather- exposed or direct - burial locations. For making inline (straight) splices on unshielded, synthetic insulated cables rated up to a maximum of 5kV and for multiple conductor cables rated up to a maximtnn of 11cV. UL Listed for direct burial and submerged applications up to 600 volts and 90 °C. For use with UL Listed connectors only. These kits will accommodate the following connectors and conductor sizes: Table A Kit No. Conductor Size Connector O.D. Cable O.D. Sheath Opening (L) (A) (B) 82 -A1 #2 AWG (max.) 13132" (maximum) 5/8" (maximum) 4 1/2" (maximum) 1/2 1/4 connector length 82 -A2 #2 AWG (min.) 5/8" (maximum) 1 "(maximum) 6" (maximum) 1/2 1/2 #3/0 (max.) connector length 82 -A3 #310 (min.) 1" (maximum) 1 9/16" (maximum) 9" (maximum) 1/2 1/2 400 kcmil (max.) connector length 2.0 Kit Contents: MoldBody ...................... ..............................A Pouring Spouts ...... ............................... Scotclirm 23 Electrical Tape ........................ C. 3MTM ScotchcastTM No. 4 Resin .................. D 3.0 Prepare Cable: 3.1 For 1000 volt: Thoroughly scrape all wax and dirt 5" back from each cable end. Prepare cable ends exactly as shown. See Table A for proper sizing and dimensions. Sheath Cutback ..................A , s lor-.5 In:ivirlur 3.2 For 5 kV maximum: Thoroughly scrape all wax and dirt 5" back from each cable end. Prepare cable ends exactly as shown. Do not cut insulation while removing outer sheath. See Table A for proper sizing and dimensions. Bare Conductor .. ..............................A Insulation Pencil .............................. B Maximum Sheath Opening .............. L 4.0 Connection 4.1 Make connections according to instructions for connector being used. The mold will accept: a) Crimped type connectors and b) Split solder sleeve connectors. 4.2 Multi- conductor Cables. Stagger individual connectors (provide lateral spacing of 1/2" between ends of connectors) and insulate connector with ScotchT 23 Electrical Tape. Sheath opening should not exceed dimension "L" in Table A. Note: Connectors not provided with kit. 4.3 Tape Over Connector Area. Apply one layer, half - lapped, Scotch 23 Electrical Tape over connector area only. Do not wrap tape onto the pencilled area. 5.0 Install Mold Body 5.1 Trim mold ends with knife to fit cable slightly loose. Hold mold halves in place, centered over splice. Snap mold halves together firmly. Check to see that both seams are carefully snapped together. Tape ends of mold body around cable to seal. Use supplied Scotch 23 Electrical Tape. IMPORTANT: Stretch tape to 314 original width. 6.0 Pour Splice 6.1 Put pouring spouts in holes. 6.2 Position splice level. Mix resin thoroughly per instructions on resin package. Pour resin immediately after mixing. Fill only through one spout until both spouts are completely filled. When resin has solidified and cooled, splice may be put into service. Clip off spouts, if desired. OOSIONddJ NVS • 71Hd13QVTHd. 1899'SZL'Of HO 'dN103W 'ad H11WS•'M SSOI ADD VkYOHdlx0 • SNV31210 MIN • NO noH SWd' OM`d' ]-.VM O � OOd01H0 • dlNdlld • ONb13A310 oil U O W N Z co N 0 o U Q CL- X :�: O W 10 QO �- W L C O J O w J V) > _LI W W o z � C � G z 2 n/� n O U O IL W o O z� �). z Q m cn Q m Z V m O J V) Q Of m 1 CD W D � O — Ci:� ' J O w C V) > _LI Q C � G 2 n/� n O • WHO z� O U n 1 o O UU W O.a U > a (S) o I. O o Q •j i U � W 3 U Z ' OOSIONVY4 NVS • VIHd130V11Hd ulO VWOHV YO • SNV3180 M3N • NOISnoH S)12�OM2i3lVM OlddlHOD ODVOIHO- • V1NVILV • (INV13A310 oil � _ 0 ` U O o z LO U m zz Q I • T _J UO o� LU ct� z 00 Q U .0 > -' rzl { �. z W �[ z w M O ] 0 w J _ Q _ _J UO o� LU ct� z 00 Q U .0 > -' rzl { �. z W �[ O ] N O � J _ Q _ _ U � I _J UO o� LU ct� z 00 Q U .0 > -' rzl 0 - Corrpro Companies Inc - TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE Introduction.............................................................. ............................... iv Delivery Inspection .................................................. ............................... iv Storage.................................................................... ............................... iv Automatic Rectifier Efficiency ................................... ..............................1 Installation............................................................... ............................... 2 Operation................................................................. ............................... 3 Maintenance............................................................ ............................... 7 Troubleshooting....................................................... ............................... 9 Glossary.................................................................... .............................17 Warranty Information .................................................. .............................19 Panel Layout Drawings ............................................ ............................... 22 Chassis Layout Drawings ........................................ ............................... 24 Enclosure Drawings ................................................. ............................... 25 Options (If Applicable) ............................................. ............................... A -Z ii fad Ak Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - INTRODUCTION This Operation Manual has been prepared for the Corrpro TASC SCR controlled IR drop free constant potential rectifier models. It is recommended that this manual be kept inside the rectifier enclosure and in the protective pouch for quick reference. This manual should be stored in the space provided. Do not place this manual so that it will impede air flow through the enclosure. CORRPRO Rectifiers are built by skilled personnel and are designed by an engineering staff with many years of experience. Every effort has been made to use the latest in reliable components, so that these rectifiers are of the highest quality consistent with reasonable costs. CORRPRO maintains a file on every rectifier by serial number only. Therefore, the SERIAL NUMBER must be specified when requesting information or ordering parts for this rectifier unit. DELIVERY INSPECTION If any damage has occurred during shipment, FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CARRIER IMMEDIATELY. Even if the rectifier unit is not being installed at the field site immediately, the rectifier should still be removed from the carton and inspected for shipping damage prior to storage of the unit. If it is necessary to contact your supplier or the manufacturer concerning damaged or missing components, be sure to include all information such as Serial Number, Purchase Order Number and Invoice Number. This will ensure that you obtain proper and expeditious service. STORAGE If the units are to be stored prior to use for extended periods of time, it is recommended that they be stored in a dry area, preferably indoors. However, if this is not possible, cardboard wrapping should be removed from around enclosures that are stored outdoors to prevent holding rain or snow moistened packaging materials against the enclosure. iv i e Mob :r - = ? Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - IR DROP FREE ERROR DESCRIPTION A phenomena exists in impressed current cathodic protection systems in which the structure -to- reference cell potential is used to continuously control the output of the rectifier. The desired structure -to- reference potential is electronically compared to the actual structure -to- reference potential generated by the cathodic protection current. An error exists in the structure -to- reference potential as normally measured and is equal to the product of the current and the resistance through the electrolyte, between the structure and reference cell. The only method which completely eliminates this IR drop error in the potential measurement is one which momentarily turns the cathodic protection current off and measures the reference cell potential while the current is zero. The structure -to- reference potential is thus sampled at the "instant -off" level. This instant -off potential is then compared with the preset desired value to control the rectifier. The TASC series controller accomplishes the above described sampling of the structure -to- reference potential to provide IR drop free automatic control. While operating in IR drop free constant potential mode the rectifier samples the voltage from the reference cell at a rate equal to twice the input voltage frequency (120 times per second for 60 Hz) just before triggering the SCRs. When the DC output of the rectifier is below the current and voltage limit the sampled structure -to- reference electrode potential is compared with the user defined potential set - point. Should the sampled potential be a value greater than the set -point (less negative) the rectifier will increase its output in response. Conversely, should the sampled potential be greater than the set -point the rectifier output will decrease. If the DC output of the rectifier reaches a level equal to the voltage or current limit settings it will be held at that point and the required structure potential level may not be met. The Corrpro TASC series of rectifiers has been designed to be a reliable, cost - effective device for the Cathodic Protection of submerged surfaces in water and wastewater facilities. Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 r= AUTOMATIC RECTIFIER EFFICIENCY - Corrpro Companies Inc - A relatively important factor when discussing Automatic C.P. type rectifiers is conversion efficiency. As the S.C.R. controller reduces the conduction time of the S.C.R.s less of the available AC secondary voltage is utilized in the conversion to DC voltage. This results in inherently poor conversion efficiencies for Automatic type rectifiers. To improve efficiency it is recommended the transformer taps be used (if available) to limit the input voltage to the bridge to the minimum amount required to maintain the desired structure -to- reference potential. INSTALLATION Proper rectifier installation procedures are necessary to ensure the integrity of the cathodic protection system. These procedures are as follows: Check all electrical connections to make sure they are tight. Though this is done at the factory, it is a'good idea to re- tighten all connections, especially those that carry electrical current. While tightening these connections use a wrench to hold one nut on the other side of the stud to prevent it from spinning or you may be inadvertently loosening other connections to the same stud. Torque Stud Size 1/4" 30 in -Ibs 3/8" 120 in -Ibs Brass Stud Torque Table 2. Select the mounting site for the rectifier; paying special attention to accessibility, proper ventilation; shielding from sources of high ambient temperatures, and most importantly, convenience to A.C. and cathodic protection connections. 3. Mount the rectifier securely on a mounting pad, wall or post (as applicable). 4. Have a qualified electrician make all electrical connections, following the electrical and local codes. A disconnect switch is required ahead of the A.C. input to the rectifier. We do not recommend connecting the rectifier to the same AC circuit as other large pieces of equipment (such as a pump -jack motor) that may cause the AC input power to fluctuate. 5. BEFORE ENERGIZING, double check to ensure the rectifier is appropriately sized for the A.C. input being applied. 6. ENSURE CORRECT POLARITY ON D.C. CONNECTIONS, connecting negative to the structure being protected and positive to the anode leads. '? Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - 7. Connect the reference cell(s) to the terminals marked "Ref" on the rectifier panel. Be sure to route reference cell wiring away from high voltage AC power or other electrical systems that may induce noise into the cables. Reference cell field wiring should be run in a separate conduit and runs more than 25 feet long should use shielded twisted pair (STP) cable. , qv — Ensure that the potential adjust potentiometer is set fully counter- clockwise and that the transformer is set to its lowest tap setting (Al). Switch the rectifier's input breaker to the "ON" position. After the slow start period there should be little or no output current showing on the panel meter (dual reading meters may need to be switch activated). Note: The automatic rectifier control card is equipped with a soft -start circuit to reduce inrush current and prevent overshoot. It is not unusual ' for the output to take a few seconds to come up. after the breaker has • been switched to the "ON" position in any of the steps that follow. Note: To prevent possible coating damage the use of a temporary test load is recommended while performing the initial setup of the rectifier. 2. Select the reference cell you wish to use with the reference cell selector switch. The selected cell is both metered and in control of the rectifier. Only one reference cell may be in control at any given time. 3. Switch off the rectifier and increase the transformer taps to maximum, typically coarse "E" and fine "5 ". Turn the rectifier back on and push the set/read switch to the "set" position. The potential set -point will be displayed on the rectifiers' potential meter. Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, A8 T5S 2A7 CANIMPIriv - Corrpro Companies Inc - 4. Adjust the potential set potentiometer clockwise while holding the set/read switch to "set" until the desired structure - to -water potential is displayed on the potential meter. As the set potential is adjusted to a value more negative than the existing reference cell potential the rectifier will respond by increasing its output. Potential Adjust Potentiometer Voltaae Adiust Potentiometer Current Adjust Potentiometer 5. Release the set/read switch and observe the rectifier output. A LED lamp on the control card will indicate which set -point is limiting the output. The colors indicate the following modes of operation: LED Color Mode of Operation (Limiting Factor) Control Card Operation Modes /LED Colors 6. Allow time for the structure to polarize. The potential value read from the meter is the "actual' reference cell potential at this time. Verify that it is decreasing (going more negative) and approaching the value of the set - point. Note: The potential meter in IR drop free rectifiers reads the IR free structure -to- reference potential as sampled by the rectifier. This reading will not match the potential measured by a DVM while the rectifier is operating. This is an indication that the IR free mode of the rectifier is functioning correctly and should not be considered as a malfunction. 4 r � Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - 7. After the structure potential reaches and slightly exceeds the potential set- point, the control card will reduce the rectifier output and allow the potential to rise (less negative) to the user selected set - point. 8. When the actual structure -to -water potential becomes equal to the set - point the control card will adjust the DC output of the rectifier to a level required to maintain that potential. The yellow LED on the control card will be illuminated to indicate the card is in potential control mode. 9. To improve rectifier efficiency record the voltage and current required to maintain the set potential. Switch the rectifier breaker to the "OFF" position and place the rectifier in manual mode. Adjust the transformer taps to provide an output voltage and current slightly greater than or the one recorded. Return the breaker to the "ON" position and verify the output voltage. Return the rectifier to AUTO mode. 10. Optionally, you may adjust the current and voltage limits to allow for additional control over the rectifier output. These limits are factory set to the maximum output voltage and current of the rectifier. If you choose to adjust them the rectifier will limit the output to whichever limit is reached first and the appropriate LED on the control card will illuminate. Note: If the target structure -to- reference cell potential cannot be attained and the rectifier is reaching either the voltage or current limits (red line) there is a problem with the cathodic protection system or the rectifier rating is insufficient to reach the desired potential. 11, The rectifier should be operated at the required D.C. output current for about one hour to determine that there are no defects in the connections. Shut the A.C. power OFF at the disconnect switch and use your meter to ensure the rectifier is electrically isolated. Immediately place your hand near current carrying connections to see that none of them are overheating. Connections may be warm, but should not feel excessively hot. CAUTION: When /If checking temperatures with your hand, the connections and parts may be hot enough to cause a serious burn. Always ensure the power is disconnected by external switch prior to reaching behind the panel. 12. Air - cooled rectifiers utilize natural air convection for cooling and are typically manufactured with screened openings on the top and bottom of the 5 enclosure. Ensure these vents are not obstructed by plugged screens or by G placing the rectifier manual over the bottom vent. Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 CIPIMP"Y - Corrpro Companies Inc - 13. The rectifier is shipped with the potential monitor alarm low and high setpoints factory configured for -850mV and - 1250mv respectively. If you wish to reconfigure the setpoints perform the following steps after the rectifier is operating normally: a. Start with both potentiometers fully counter - clockwise. This will ensure the low potential setting is at its minimum and the high potential setting is at its maximum. b. Determine the low potential set -point (least negative potential) at which the alarm is to be activated. Place and hold the set/read switch in the "SET" position and adjust the set potential potentiometer to the desired low potential set - point. C. While still holding the switch in the "SET" position slowly adjust the trim potentiometer labeled "LOW" clockwise until the yellow LED becomes illuminated. d. Determine the high potential set -point (most negative potential) at which the alarm is to be activated. Place and hold the set/read switch in the "SET" position and adjust the set potential potentiometer to the desired high potential set - point. e. While still holding the switch in the "SET" position slowly adjust the trim potentiometer labeled "HIGH" clockwise until the red LED becomes illuminated. f. Return the potential setpoint to the level you wish the rectifier to maintain and release the "SET" switch. g. The alarm board will now automatically monitor the potential, illuminating the yellow LED and the red external fault lamp should the potential drop below the "LOW" set -point and illuminating the red LED and the red external fault lamp should the potential rise above the "HIGH" set - point. If the potential remains between the "HIGH" and "LOW" set - points the green internal /external lamp will be illuminated. 14. Periodically monitor the rectifier, re- adjusting as necessary to maintain the level of cathodic protection current required. Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 0 - Corrpro Companies Inc - x�f� g M C.P. rectifiers have few moving parts therefore maintenance is largely of a preventative nature. Bear in mind there are primarily three conditions that will affect the life of a C.P. rectifier: 1. Excessive component temperatures. 2. Voltage surges and lightning. 3. Excessive current output. Maintenance can be the best deterrent against rectifier failure due to excessive temperatures. Regular checks for blocked venting and /or heat from an external source should be undertaken. Periodic re- tightening of electrical connections is good insurance against future trouble. (See installation section, clause 1) CAUTION: Hazardous voltages are present within the rectifier. ALWAYS interrupt the A.C. power at the nearby disconnect. The rectifier A.C. breaker DOES NOT totally remove all incoming A.C. power from the rectifier. If excessive heating of rectifier components and /or wiring is suspected, a temperature probe is a very useful maintenance tool. The following is a guide for maximum temperatures. These temperatures are based on a 45 ambient. The difference between 45 and the ambient temperature at time of testing should be subtracted from the readings in this table: C OMPONENT Modular Bridge MEASUREMENT PO Module Body /// f/ NAZAROOl15 VOLTAGE Contact may cause elecldc M3 `� shock abum. Tum ofland bck outpwror Main Transformer C.P. rectifiers have few moving parts therefore maintenance is largely of a preventative nature. Bear in mind there are primarily three conditions that will affect the life of a C.P. rectifier: 1. Excessive component temperatures. 2. Voltage surges and lightning. 3. Excessive current output. Maintenance can be the best deterrent against rectifier failure due to excessive temperatures. Regular checks for blocked venting and /or heat from an external source should be undertaken. Periodic re- tightening of electrical connections is good insurance against future trouble. (See installation section, clause 1) CAUTION: Hazardous voltages are present within the rectifier. ALWAYS interrupt the A.C. power at the nearby disconnect. The rectifier A.C. breaker DOES NOT totally remove all incoming A.C. power from the rectifier. If excessive heating of rectifier components and /or wiring is suspected, a temperature probe is a very useful maintenance tool. The following is a guide for maximum temperatures. These temperatures are based on a 45 ambient. The difference between 45 and the ambient temperature at time of testing should be subtracted from the readings in this table: C OMPONENT Modular Bridge MEASUREMENT PO Module Body TEMPERATURE 110 OC Discrete Diode Case 115 OC Main Transformer Primary Winding 160 OC Filter Inductor (Choke) Winding 160 OC Filter Capacitor Case 80 OC Secondary /DC O/P Fuse Metal End Cap 130 OC Current Shunt Center Element 75 OC Electrical Connections Bolt Body 90 OC Electrical Wiring Wire Harness 90 OC Component Temperature Table rJ Maintenance against voltage surges is largely one of ensuring the lightning and surge protection supplied with the unit is intact. Whenever possible, keep large motor driven ' 1' Cori Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - equipment (such as a pump -jack motor) or similar surge producing electrical equipment from being attached to the same A.C. power line as the rectifier. Lightning rods may prove invaluable in excessive lightning areas. As the S.C.R. control card has the ability to limit the current and voltage output of this rectifier, excessive currents should not be a problem so long as the factory set calibration is not altered and the control card is functioning properly. Meter - readings should be verified with an external Digital Voltmeter. A quick check for ammeter accuracy can be made by measuring the millivolt drop across the shunt. This should be done with a high input impedance meter set to the "mV" range. The actual reading is given by the formula: 71217 X I sliu " n Where: I DC = The DC Current though-the shunt mV = The voltage (millivolts) read across the shunt terminals IsHUNT = The current rating stamped on the shunt mVsHUNT = The mV rating stamped on the shunt (usually 50mV) Meter accuracy should be within 2% of the full -scale deflection of the meter combined with an allowance for temperature of 0.85% per 10°C for temperatures other than 25°C. A periodic check of rectifier conversion efficiency will also indicate if the rectifier is functioning properly. if a portable A.C. wattmeter is unavailable, the utility pole mounted watt-hour meter could be used. This, of course, is if no other electrical loads are drawing power when the A.C. draw is being determined. 3600 xK x * AC Paw (Watts) = T Where: K = The Watt -Hour meter constant (shown on meter face) N = Number of revolutions of watt -hour disk T = Time (seconds) for the number of revolutions to take place. 8 Where: DC (Volt) = The DC voltage measured at the rectifier output terminals Corrpro Rectifier Division ( 10848 -214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - DC (Amp)= The DC current measured at the shunt or read from the meter Rectifier conversion efficiency will be: DC Powei Out Rec:ti fie -7rt Ef fici.e7i.cy ( _ X 100 SIC Power 17:� For a TASC rectifier, the conversion efficiency is dependent on the tap setting and the output voltage of the rectifier. For details on achieving optimal efficiency refer to the "Automatic Rectifier Efficiency" section in this manual. § � TROUBLESHOO "i Although quality construction and preventative maintenance will reduce rectifier down time, failures will occasionally occur. A good knowledge of rectifier operation will enable a potential problem to be quickly traced and repaired. RECTIFIER TEST EQUIPMENT: At a minimum, the following test and safety equipment should be readily available to anyone servicing the rectifier: i) All PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) required by law. ii) A high quality DMM (Digital Multimeter) with the following functions and features: (1) Minimum CAT III 600V (2) Rugged and weatherproof (3) AC & DC Volts (4) AC & DC Amps (5) Resistance (Ohms) (6) Continuity with tone (7) Diode test (8) Frequency (Hz) iii) A proximity voltage detector (such as a voltage pen) iv) A suitable resistive test load v) A clamp on ammeter capable of reading both AC and DC current vi) A complete set of hand tools, extra wire and a good variety of crimp terminals vii) A fuse puller The following optional equipment is useful for rectifier troubleshooting: i) A two channel Scopemeter Corrpro Rectifier Division ( 10848 -214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 8 WARNIfV�: HAZARDOUS VOLTAGE C.AW.1 my taus elwa. shock ar bum Tum off and lack out power before semcin . "` -- -'- Although quality construction and preventative maintenance will reduce rectifier down time, failures will occasionally occur. A good knowledge of rectifier operation will enable a potential problem to be quickly traced and repaired. RECTIFIER TEST EQUIPMENT: At a minimum, the following test and safety equipment should be readily available to anyone servicing the rectifier: i) All PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) required by law. ii) A high quality DMM (Digital Multimeter) with the following functions and features: (1) Minimum CAT III 600V (2) Rugged and weatherproof (3) AC & DC Volts (4) AC & DC Amps (5) Resistance (Ohms) (6) Continuity with tone (7) Diode test (8) Frequency (Hz) iii) A proximity voltage detector (such as a voltage pen) iv) A suitable resistive test load v) A clamp on ammeter capable of reading both AC and DC current vi) A complete set of hand tools, extra wire and a good variety of crimp terminals vii) A fuse puller The following optional equipment is useful for rectifier troubleshooting: i) A two channel Scopemeter Corrpro Rectifier Division ( 10848 -214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - ii) A LCR meter capable of measuring capacitance greater than 15,000µF and inductance greater than 10mH iii) A infrared temperature probe iv) A variable DC power supply with both voltage and current limiting features v) Hi -Pot tester TROUBLESHOOTING SAFETY The following procedures should be adhered to when troubleshooting any rectifier: 1. Visually inspect your environment, look for non - electrical hazards such as water or animals. 2. Approach the case with caution. Test the case with a voltage pen prior to grasping the latch /handle. Consider testing for any voltage on nearby metal objects such as fences and mounting framework. 3. Identify and locate an external disconnect switch for the rectifier. Never work behind a rectifier panel with only the panel breaker off as there may still be hazardous voltages at the circuit breaker line terminals. 4. Follow all local and company safety rules and regulations. BASIC TROUBLESHOOTING PROCEDURES Basic troubleshooting begins with a visual inspection of the rectifier. You are looking for burnt or discolored wires and components, loose or hanging parts and anything out of place. Evidence of arcing or heat discoloration on the frame can indicate surge damage or overheating. If there is no visual evidence of damage thoroughly identify the symptoms of the problem and compile a list of possible causes. Follow this by systematically isolating and testing the individual components whenever possible. Don't hesitate to call the manufacturer or sales office for assistance if you are unsure about anything. The majority of rectifier faults are easy to diagnose. They include loss of A.C. input, blown fuses, loose terminals, faulty meters, blown M.O.V, suppressors, open circuits, faulty cathodic load connections and lightning damage. Automatic rectifiers often contain additional components such as chokes, capacitors, SCR's, control transformers and control circuitry. Not all automatic rectifiers are field serviceable and, in some cases, will need to be returned an authorized service center for repair. The initial inspection should be followed by a systematic isolation of various rectifier 10 components to determine the cause of failure. This should be conducted as follows (refer to the schematic for test point locations �- y_. Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, A8 T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - CAUTION: Beware of hazardous electrical voltages and where they are present in the rectifier. If doing any work on a rectifier other than taking voltage or current : measurements, DISCONNECT THE A.C. POWER, preferably at the rectifier -- - - - disconnect, not just using the rectifier circuit breaker. Check whether A.C. voltage is present at the rectifier input terminals and that it is the correct level for the rectifier input rating. Provided the input breaker has not tripped OFF, this voltage check should be done with the rectifier ON. This will eliminate any static voltage reading such as might be experienced if only one A.C. line entering the rectifier is broken. 2. If the input breaker continues to trip OFF when energized, this usually indicates a short circuit within the rectifier. Proceed as follows; a) Check the bridge assembly and replace defective components if required. (See #8 below) b) With the rectifier disconnected from the A.C. supply, isolate the AC surge arrestor from the rest of the rectifier circuit. Do an ohmmeter check between ground lug and the load side(s) of the input breaker (right side of CB1 on schematic). Any detectable resistance will indicate a primary to ground breakdown. A "Megger" test instrument is preferred for this test if available. Any fault will necessitate replacement of the transformer. NOTE: The installation of certain options (heaters, GFI outlets, alarm cards etc.) may result in additional components connected to the load side of the breaker. The existence of these components will affect the results of this test. c) Visually inspect the transformer for any signs of burned or shorted windings. d) Check for shorted A.C. lightning arrestors. 3. An intermittent voltage reading nearly always indicates a loose or burned connection. Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 11 4. Check if the rectifier has an automatic /manual switch. If this switch is present disconnect the power or turn off the panel breaker and place the switch in ORO the manual mode. Adjust the taps for the desired output voltage and re- Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - energize the rectifier. If the rectifier operates properly in the constant voltage (manual) mode the problem is most likely limited to the control card. 5.' Verify if there is transformer secondary voltage. If the rectifier has taps measure the voltage across COARSE 'E' and FINE 'S'. This voltage should be 1.35 to 1.6 times the D.C. output voltage rating of the rectifier. If the rectifier does not have taps this measurement must be taken across the AC terminals of the SCR /Diode bridge. 6. If the rectifier has taps, verify the COARSE steps as being approximately 20% of the measurement (item 4 above) and that the FINE steps are approximately 20% of the voltage of each COARSE step. 7. If no LEDs are illuminated on the control card verify the presence of AC voltage (115 or 230 VAC) across pins 20 and 22 of the edge connector. 8. The SCR / Diode bridge is the device that converts the alternating current (AC) from the secondary of the transformer to direct current (DC) for use in cathodic protection. This device can fail due to a voltage surge into the AC or DC side of the unit (generally protected by the surge arrestors and fusing in the unit). The SCR / Diode bridge can fail to a "short circuit" or an "open circuit" condition. If the AC input circuit breaker in the unit trips, the rectifier bridge could be "shorted" and may need replacement. Each device in the bridge can be easily checked for a short circuit with a DVM on diode check by measuring across the device terminals (refer to the electrical schematic supplied with this manual and the table shown below). Alternately, if rated current cannot be achieved from the unit, part of the bridge in the unit could have become discontinuous (or "open ") and it may again, need replacement. The SCR devices are not easy to check with a DVM for this condition as, until a gate signal is applied, they are always "open ". The tables on the following pages outline the test procedure for typical single phase and three phase SCR /Diode modules 12 tg gm Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 a - Corrpro Companies Inc - Test DVIVI Lead DVIVI Lead DVIVI Reading comments Typical .. . Step Positive Negative (Diod 1 Bridge ( -) ACi Low (0.3 -0.7) Diode 1 Single Beep Forward Bias 2 ACi Bridge ( -) High (OL) Diode 1 No Audio Reverse Block ----- G' 3 Bridge ( -) AC2 Low (0.3 -0.7) Diode 2 ; i sce1 sCR2 + i Single Beep Forward Bias 4 AC2 Bridge ( -) High (OL) Diode 2 No Audio Reverse Block _ ^ °i 5 SCR 1 (G1) Bridge ( +) Low (0.05 — 0.1) SCR 1 Gate Gate Continuous Tone ' 6 SCR 2 (G2) Bridge ( +) Low (0.05 — 0.1) SCR 2 Gate Gate Continuous Tone ; AC2 7 ACi Bridge ( +) High (OL) SCR 1 No Audio Forward Block i DI D2 `- a Bridge ( +) ACi High (OL) SCR 1 No Audio Reverse Block - 9 AC2 Bridge ( +) High (OL) SCR 2 xPE No Audio Forward Block L-------- ---------- - -- - -� 10 Bridge ( +) AC2 High (OL) SCR 2 No Audio Reverse Block Single Phase SCR /Diode Module Test Procedure 13 i -� COW Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - Test DVM Lead DVM Lead DVM Reading Comments Ty I pical Di agra m Step Positive Negative (Diod 1 Bridge ( -) AC1 Low (0.3 -0.7) Diode 1 Forward Single Beep Bias 2 AC1 Bridge( -) High (OL) Diode. 1 Reverse No Audio Block Bridge ( -) AC2 Low (0.3 -0.7) Diode 2 Forward Single Beep Bias 4 AC2 Bridge ( -) High (OL) Diode 2 Reverse No Audio Block ---------- 5 Bridge ( -) AC3 Low (0.3 -0.7) Diode 3 Forward Single Beep Bias r �, I oqn'. I I 6 AC3 Bridge ( -) High (OL) Diode 3 Reverse No Audio Audio Block i - - - - - -- 7 SCR 1 (gate) Bridge ( +) Low (0.05 — 0.1) SCR 1 Gate Continuous Tone a� r-- - -- I I 8 SCR 2 (gate) Bridge ( +) Low (0.05 — 0.1) SCR 2 Gate Continuous Tone 9 SCR 3 (gate) Bridge ( +) Low (0.05 — 0.1) SCR 3 Gate Tone Continuous Tone I I I F -- - - -� 10 AC1 Bridge ( +) High (OL) SCR 1 No Audio Forward Block — 11 Bridge ( +) AC1 High (OL) SCR 1 No Audio Reverse Block ep1D0E i I 12 AC2 Bridge ( +) High (OL) SCR 2 No Audio Forward Block fine) WA.) fv�e) 13 Bridge ( +) AC2 High (OL) SCR 2 No Audio Reverse Block 14 AC3 Bridge ( +) High (OL) SCR 3 No Audio Forward Block 15 Bridge ( -) AC3 High (OL) SCR 3 No Audio Reverse Block Three Phase SCR /Diode Module Test Procedure 9. Check for the presence of voltage at the D.C. positive and negative 14 terminals of the bridge and at the rectifier D.C. output terminals. If the } . voltage is present at the stack but not at the terminals, check for open circuits in the wiring (or a blown D.C. fuse). Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - NOTE: With no load, a sensitive electronic meter may read a static potential which is much higher than the actual D.C. voltage. It may be necessary to place, a small load across the rectifier output lugs that will eliminate the false reading of the electronic voltmeter. 10. If the correct D.C. voltage is measured at the rectifier D.C. output terminals but no D.C. output current is measured, there is an open circuit in the D.C. output circuit. This open circuit could be either in the cables leading to the C.P. load or in the connection to the C.P. load. 11. Ensure that you verify rectifier panel meter readings with an external Digital Voltmeter (DVM). Rectifier meters may indicate a rectifier fault when no actual fault exists. 12. Meter switches are often a source of meter reading faults, especially in corrosive or H environments. If the rectifier switches are a continuous problem, environmentally sealed switches should be used to replace normal types. The added cost for these may save future repair work and rectifier troubleshooting time. Jumpers carefully placed across the closed contacts of a suspect switch will reveal any high resistance contact problems that may exist. 13. Lightning and surge suppressors can be checked for shorts by removing their connections from the rectifier circuit and checking them with an ohmmeter. Normally these should exhibit an open circuit (infinite resistance). 14. If the rectifier has no /low output use your DVM to check the voltage from the reference cell. The rectifier control card is designed to reduce the DC output to a minimum level if the reference cell fails or if the wires connecting the reference cell are broken. On TASC rectifiers this problem may also be caused by a defective reference cell selector switch or a switch in the wrong position. Note: The potential meter in IR drop free rectifiers reads the IR free structure -to- reference potential as sampled by the rectifier. This 15 reading will not match the potential measured by a DVM while the rectifier is operating. This is an indication that the IR free mode of_;a,; the rectifier is functioning correctly and is not a malfunction.`': = ` , y Corrpro Rectifier Division 1 10848 -214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 CUMPIMP - Corrpro Companies Inc - 15. Potential controlled rectifiers can sometimes act erratically if the reference cell cable is too long and is picking up interference from other electrical systems nearby. If you measure frequent "spikes" or read an unstable voltage at the reference cell terminals with your DVM you may have induced noise on the line which is causing the rectifier to sample false potentials from the cell. To counteract this effect it is recommended to run the cable in a separate conduit and to use shielded twisted pair (STP) cable if the reference cell cable will be more than 25 feet long. If you require any assistance when troubleshooting the rectifier, please contact the local Corrpro office or the factory for technical assistance. A few minutes of technical help can, in many cases, save many hundreds of dollars in on -site time or repair freight charges. M . a; Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - GLOSSARY Alternating Current An electrical current whose magnitude and direction vary cyclically. Capacitor An electrical device that can store energy in the space between two closely spaced conductors or plates. Capacitors are commonly used in rectifiers for filtering. Cathodic Protection A technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface by making it the cathode of an electrochemical cell. Constant Current Rectifier A type of automatic rectifier that adjusts the output voltage to maintain a constant current though the load. Constant Potential Rectifier A type of automatic rectifier that adjusts the output voltage to maintain a constant structure to reference cell potential. Constant Voltage Rectifier A type of rectifier, manual (tap adjust) or automatic that maintains a constant voltage across the load. This is the most common type of rectifier in use. Current The flow (movement) of electric charge. Diode An electronic component which allows current to flow in one direction and blocks it in the opposite direction. Diode Bridge An assembly of four or more diodes into a Full -Wave bridge. Diode Module An electronic device having two or more diodes integrated into a single component. Direct Current An electrical current whose direction remains constant. Filter The process of smoothing the rectifier output to improve efficiency and reduce ripple. 17 Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB TSS 2A7 e - Corrpro Companies Inc - Frequency The rate at which a periodic waveform repeats its self in one second. Fuse An overcurrent protection device which contains a piece of wire or "fusible link" designed to melt when a prescribed amount of electric current passes through it. IR Drop Free Constant A type of Constant Potential Rectifier that always Potential Rectifier samples the structure -to- reference potential right after zero crossing of the DC output waveform to eliminate IR drop error from the measurement. M.O.V Acronym for Metal Oxide Varistor. Used to protect circuits against excess transient voltages (surges). Potential In the Cathodic Protection industry it describes the voltage as measured between the structure being protected and a copper sulfate, zinc or other half -cell. Short for pipe to soil or structure to reference cell potential. Rectification The process of converting alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC). Resistance A measure of the degree to which an object opposes the passing of electrical current. Measured in Ohms. S.C.R An acronym for Silicon Controlled Rectifier. The SCR is a member of a family of devices called Thyristors. Thyristor A solid state semiconductor device that acts as a switch, conducting when the gate receives a current pulse and continues to conduct for as long as it is forward biased. Transformer An electrical device that transfers energy from one circuit to another by magnetic coupling. Voltage A difference of electrical potential between two points. Voltage can be thought of as an electrical "pressure_" 18 which allows current to flow. Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 - Corrpro Companies Inc - Appendix A: Warranty 19 F Ij Corrpro Rectifier Division 10848 -214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S. 2A7 O of O ro fl N C t6 Rf 4' W LL O C L a) � L 'E O 'L- O O O N C+ O CO �'R3� LL F" L (Y Q C Q'O O C U Q C C +" O '�O N C a) O Ca E a) W C 0 0 U (0 0 o a) v CLE.- 3 0.- � o 3 'C (� Q (15 L C a) 0' a) C a) >, C a) Q O n c e- �:c `M R �, o ro-0 P CO 0C EroE�oa)L W CL ro �x O a) 03L ~ 0)� L �,° a) C o '— N + C to a) '0 C C C to (L 3 0a)i n 0 ) '0a)� �. U t(6 C -0 'C - a) a) Q O'>, tM m .Q O C a) cn E 0 O M > to n W- U) t3 co a) c -0 t- : ro ro a) (U U � ui �' ° () o r-`_ I ro m p aa) a a) o c � CO R C E C (iS y U E N " L � E CO 0 w a a) i 0_ o C)— E EY o ) OY - c�� o�roE O. �v C E'- o �c�o0 = a) O_ C C E0 a) 0 >C O-0 Q) LO C O "'a� coax. -F L � O co LO 0 C +' a) O - r- C L . 0 > Y .0 V1 J .> 0 0 M-0 C N U a) (n a) t6 Ql ~d L_ 0 L Q Q Cu Co � cn .� 0 (D O Z 0 -zsroro va)oa3��u)C�yEa ct3 a) r- :3 C to 0- 0 .0 " CO (D � M a) W W t N�_L� V 0 tA , - r '0 C C F " O a)� o 0 •C a)- i6 < U Nn7Q -P`0 Z ro v (a o x- 0 0 i as n 2 .o c _c Q-. o a`)�a 0 � E U "' O��- G) 0a) 3 C a) a > •— C U) C E m C9 0 0 0 � O co O �.N 7 a) '-� to af1U Q•C•N C• C {� moo' LLJ �. ro OQ a)^ a) 0 N y CO C () C N 0 `) ' 0 °) E E ro a�i . c6.0 0 Z O U C Q � 0;00Y.UNa O)O iv >O. ro d! 19 F Ij Corrpro Rectifier Division 10848 -214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S. 2A7 o - Corrpro Companies Inc- 1 Main DC Fuse 1 10 Reference Cell 2 Binding Post 2 Potential Control Status & Adjustment 11 Reference Cell Selector Switch 3 Secondary AC Fuse 12 Metering Test Points 4 Voltage Control Status & Adjustment 13 Potential Meter 5 Current Control Status & Adjustment 14 Ammeter 6 Potential Set/Read Switch 15 Voltmeter 7 Main Circuit Breaker 16 Potential Alarm Indicator Lights 8 Structure Reference Bindin Post 17 Potential Alarm Set Point Adjustment 20 Oka Corrpro Rectifier Division 110848-214 Street Edmonton, AB T5S 2A7 Appendix B: TASC Front Panel Layout e - Corrpro Companies Inc - Number 1 Description Main DC Fuse Number 11 Description Reference Cell Selector Switch 2 Potential Control Status & Adjustment 12 Metering Test Points 3 Secondary AC Fuse 13 Ammeter Selector Switch 4 Voltage Control Status & Ad 14 Potential Meter 5 Current Control Status & Ad 15 Ammeter 6 Potential Set/Read Switch 16 Voltmeter 7 Main Circuit Breaker 17 Potential Alarm Indicator Lights 8 Structure Reference Binding Post 18 Potential Alarm Set Point Ad 9 Reference Cell 1 Binding Post 19 Riser /Aux. Circuit Rheostat 10 Reference Cell 2 Binding Post 20 Riser /Aux. 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