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Cottage Grove Water Supply Plan June 2018 Formerly called Water Emergency & Water Conservation Plan December 2016 (Updated per DNR Comments June 2018) Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Table of Contents PART 1. WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM DESCRIPTION AND EVALUATION.................................. 4 A. Analysis of Water Demand................................................................................................................ 4 B. Treatment and Storage Capacity ...................................................................................................... 6 C. Water Sources ................................................................................................................................... 7 5͵ CǒƷǒƩĻ 5ĻƒğƓķ tƩƚƆĻĭƷźƚƓƭ Α Key Metropolitan Council Benchmark .............................................. 8 E. Resource Sustainability ................................................................................................................... 10 F. Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) ...................................................................................................... 15 Part 2. Emergency Preparedness Procedures ........................................................................... 17 A. Federal Emergency Response Plan ................................................................................................. 17 B. Operational Contingency Plan ........................................................................................................ 17 C. Emergency Response Procedures ................................................................................................... 17 Progress since 2006 ................................................................................................................................ 23 A. Triggers for Allocation and Demand Reduction Actions ................................................................. 24 B. Conservation Objectives and Strategies Α YĻǤ ĬĻƓĭŷƒğƩƉ ŅƚƩ 5bw ............................................... 25 Objective 1: Reduce Unaccounted (Non-Revenue) Water loss to Less than 10% ............................ 25 Objective 2: Achieve Less than 75 Residential Gallons per Capita Demand (GPCD) ....................... 27 Objective 3: Achieve at least a 1.5% per year water reduction for Institutional, Industrial, Commercial, and Agricultural GPCD over the next 10 years or a 15% reduction in ten years. ......... 28 Objective 4: Achieve a Decreasing Trend in Total Per Capita Demand ............................................. 29 Objective 5: Reduce Peak Day Demand so that the Ratio of Average Maximum day to the Average Day is less than 2.6 ............................................................................................................................. 29 Objective 6: Implement a Conservation Water Rate Structure and/or a Uniform Rate Structure with a Water Conservation Program ............................................................................................................. 29 Objective 7: Additional strategies to Reduce Water Use and Support Wellhead Protection Planning ............................................................................................................................................................ 32 Objective 8: Tracking Success: How will you track or measure success through the next ten years? ............................................................................................................................................................ 32 A. Regulation ....................................................................................................................................... 33 B. Retrofitting Programs ..................................................................................................................... 34 C. Education and Information Programs ............................................................................................. 35 1 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Part 4. ITEMS FOR METROPOLITAN AREA COMMUNITIES .................................................. 38 A. Water Demand Projections through 2040 ...................................................................................... 38 B. Potential Water Supply Issues ........................................................................................................ 38 C. Proposed Alternative Approaches to Meet Extended Water Demand Projections ....................... 38 D. Value-Added Water Supply Planning Efforts (Optional) ................................................................. 39 Appendix List A PPENDIX 1: W ELL RECORDS AND MAINTENANCE SUMMARIES PPENDIX 2: W ATER LEVEL MONITORING PLAN A A PPENDIX 3: W ATER LEVEL GRAPHS FOR EACH WATER SUPPLY WELL A PPENDIX 4: C APITAL I MPROVEMENT P LAN A PPENDIX 5: E MERGENCY T ELEPHONE L IST A PPENDIX 6: C OOPERATIVE A GREEMENTS FOR E MERGENCY S ERVICES PPENDIX 7: M UNICIPAL C RITICAL W ATER D EFICIENCY O RDINANCE A A PPENDIX 8: G RAPH SHOWING ANNUAL PER CAPITA WATER DEMAND FOR EACH CUSTOMER CATEGORY DURING THE LAST TEN-YEARS A PPENDIX 9: W ATER R ATE S TRUCTURE A PPENDIX 10: A DOPTED OR PROPOSED REGULATIONS TO REDUCE DEMAND OR IMPROVE WATER EFFICIENCY A PPENDIX 11: I MPLEMENTATION C HECKLIST 2 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Complete Table 1 with information about the public water supply system covered by this WSP. Table 1. General information regarding this WSP Requested Information Description DNR Water Appropriation Permit Number(s)1977-6349 Ownership Public Metropolitan Council Area Yes, Washington County Street Address 12800 Ravine ParkwaySouth City, State, Zip Cottage Grove, MN, 55016 Contact Person Name Les Burshten Title Public Works Director Phone Number 651-458-2810 MDH Supplier Classification Municipal 3 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 PART 1. WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM DESCRIPTION AND EVALUATION The first step in any water supply analysis is to assess the current status of demand and availability. Information summarized in Part 1 can be used to develop Emergency Preparedness Procedures (Part 2) and the Water Conservation Plan (Part 3). This data is also needed to track progress for water efficiency measures. A.Analysis of Water Demand Complete Table 2 showing the past 10 years of water demand data. Some of this information may be in your Wellhead Protection Plan. If you do not have this information, do your best, call your engineer for assistance or if necessary leave blank. If your customer categories are different than the ones listed in Table 2, please describe the differences below: NA Complete Table 3 by listing the top 10 water users by volume, from largest to smallest. For each user, include information about the category of use (residential, commercial, industrial, institutional, or wholesale), the amount of water used in gallons per year, the percent of total water delivered, and the status of water conservation measures. 4 Total per capita Demand (GPCD) Residential Per Capita Demand (GPCD) Date of Max. Demand Max. Daily Demand (MGD) Implementing Water Conservation? (Yes/No/Unknown) Average Daily Demand (MGD) Percent of Total Annual Water Delivered Percent Unmetered/ Unaccounted Water Supplier Services Amount Used (Gallons per Year) 5 Total Water Pumped (MG) Α DğƌƌƚƓƭ ƦĻƩ /ğƦźƷğ ƦĻƩ 5ğǤ Total Water Delivered (MG) GPCD MMERCIAL 4,204,000 0.40% UNKNOWN Wholesale Deliveries (MG) Use Category (Residential, Industrial, Commercial, Institutional) INSTITUTIONAL 3,421,000 0.32% UNKNOWN Water used for Non-essential N RESIDENTIAL 3,128,000 0.29% UNKNOWN C/I/I Water Delivered (MG) . COMMERCIAL 2,950,000 0.28% UNKNOWN Million Gallons per Day Residential Water Delivered (MG) aD5 Α Total Connections 35,185 10,530 961 188 1,149 1,284 10.5% 3.43 9.17 74.8 100.0 Pop. Served Million Gallons Avg. 2005 34,315 9472 917 280 1,197 1,313 8.8% 3.60 13.40 7/16/05 73.2 104.8 2006 34,383 10,056 1,000 371 1,371 1,514 9.5% 4.15 11.50 7/6/06 79.7 120.6 2007 34,408 10,260 1,084 426 1,510 1,571 3.9% 4.30 12.56 7/6/07 86.3 125.1 2008 34,510 10,298 1,101 275 1,376 1,378 0.2% 3.77 10.96 7/6/08 87.4 109.4 2009 34,792 10,381 1,057 221 1,278 1,355 5.7% 3.71 10.34 6/3/09 83.2 106.7 2010 34,935 10,418 911 180 1,091 1,217 10.3% 3.34 8.25 8/29/10 71.4 95.4 2011 35,105 10,474 947 180 1,127 1,275 11.6% 3.49 8.47 9/11/11 73.9 99.5 2012 35,120 10,472 1,155 197 1,352 1,500 9.9% 4.11 11.29 7/12/12 90.1 117.0 2013 35,300 10,553 983 194 1,177 1,323 11.1% 3.63 10.18 8/26/13 76.3 102.7 2014 35,150 10,491 891 190 1,081 1,201 9.9% 2.76 9.66 8/15/14 69.4 93.6 2015 35,500 10,769 877 187 1,064 1,187 10.4% 3.26 7.15 8/02/15 67.7 91.6 2015 2010- Year Customer 1 HINTON HEIGHTS RESIDENTIAL 91,728,000 8.6% UNKNOWN 2 UP NORTH PLASTICS INDUSTRIAL 8,524,000 0.80% UNKNOWN 3 PARK SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL INSTITUTIONAL 7,475,000 0.70% UNKNOWN 4 MISTER CAR WASH COMMERCIAL 4,678,000 0.44% UNKNOWN Ў Ih\[L5!— {!Lhb Α I!5\[9— !9b 9 /haa9w/L!\[ ЍͲЌЏВͲЉЉЉ Љ͵ЍЊі bYbh‘b Џ .t {!Lhb Α W!a!L/! !9b 9 /h7 SOUTH WASHINGTON COUNTY SERVICE CENTER8 MISSISSIPPI DUNES TOWNHOME ASSOCIATIOВ Ih\[L5!— {!Lhb Α tLb9 !w.hw 5w10 WALMART COMMERCIAL 2,920,000 0.27% UNKNOWN Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Table 2. Historic water demand aD Α Table 3. Large volume users Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 B.Treatment and Storage Capacity Complete Table 4 with a description of where water is treated, the year treatment facilities were constructed, water treatment capacity, the treatment methods (i.e. chemical addition, reverse osmosis, coagulation, sedimentation, etc.) and treatment types used (i.e. fluoridation, softening, chlorination, Fe/MN removal, coagulation, etc.). Also describe the annual amount and method of disposal of treatment residuals. Add rows to the table as needed. Table 4. Water treatment capacity and treatment processes Treatment Year Treatment Treatment Treatment Annual Disposal Reclaim Site ID (Plant ConstructCapacity Method Type Amount of Process Filter Name or ed (GPM) Residuals for Backwash Well ID) Residuals Water? Well No. 1 1958 600 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 208808 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 2 1958 600 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 208809 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 3 Well 1960 800 GAC Filtration Pressure FiltersOnly when Sanitary No 208807 WTP 2017 and Chemical Chlorination GAC needs to Sewer Addition Fluoridation be replaced Well No. 4 1962 1000 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 208805 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 5 1967 1000 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 208806 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 6 1973 1000 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 201238 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 7 1974 1000 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 201227 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 8 1977 1500 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 110464 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 9 1979 1500 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 165602 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 10 Well 1984 1800 GAC Filtration Pressure FiltersOnly when Sanitary No 191904 WTP 2017 and Chemical Chlorination GAC needs to Sewer Addition Fluoridation be replaced Well No. 11 2004 1500 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 655944 Addition Fluoridation Well No. 12 2017 1500 Chemical ChlorinationNA NANA 830682 Addition Fluoridation Total NA 13,800 NANANA NANA Complete Table 5 with information about storage structures. Describe the type (i.e. elevated, ground, etc.), the storage capacity of each type of structure, the year each structure was constructed, and the primary material for each structure. Add rows to the table as needed. 6 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Table 5. Storage capacity, as of the end of the last calendar year Structure Name Type of Storage Year ConstructedPrimary MaterialStorage Capacity Structure (Gallons) Thompson Grove Elevated storage 1958Steel150,000 Pine Hill School Elevated Storage 1985Steel500,000 Highlands Elevated Storage 1971Steel1,500,000 West Draw Elevated Storage 2004Steel1,500,000 1.0 MG Ground Ground Storage 1962Steel1,000,000 3.0 MG Ground Ground Storage 1980Steel3,000,000 TOTAL Α 6 Tanks NA NANA7,150,000 Gallons Treatment and storage capacity versus demand It is recommended that total storage equal or exceed the average daily demand. Discuss the difference between current storage and treatment capacity veƩƭǒƭ ƷŷĻ ǞğƷĻƩ ƭǒƦƦƌźĻƩ͸ƭ ƦƩƚƆĻĭƷĻķ ğǝĻƩğŭĻ ǞğƷĻƩ demand over the next 10 years (see Table 7 for projected water demand): The projected 2025 average daily demand is approximately 4.0 MGD and the maximum day demand is 12.0 MGD. /ƚƷƷğŭĻ DƩƚǝĻ͸ƭ ĻǣźƭƷźƓŭ ŅźƩƒ ǞĻƌƌ ĭğƦğĭźƷǤ ƚŅ ЊЎ͵Њ aD5 (with 2 wells out of service) exceeds the projected 2025 maximum day demand. The existing storage capacity of greater than 7.0 MG is greater than the average day demand of 4.0 MGD. However, additional storage in the Low Pressure Zone is being considered to support growth in the Industrial Park. C.Water Sources Complete Table 6 by listing all types of water sources that supply water to the system, including groundwater, surface water, interconnections with other water suppliers, or others. Provide the name of each source (aquifer name, river or lake name, name of interconnecting water supplier) and the Minnesota unique well number or intake ID, as appropriate. Report the year the source was installed or established and the current capacity. Provide information about the depth of all wells. Describe the status of the source (active, inactive, emergency only, retail/wholesale interconnection) and if the source facilities have a dedicated emergency power source. Add rows to the table as needed for each installation. Include copies of well records and maintenance summary for each well that has occurred since your last approved plan in Appendix 1. Table 6. Water sources and status Resource Type Resource Name MN Unique Year Capacity Well Status of Normal Does this Source (Groundwater, Well # or Installed (Gallons Depth and Emergency have a Dedicated Surface water, Intake ID per (Feet) Operations Emergency Power Interconnection) Minute) Source? Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 1 1958 600 352 Active Yes Du Chien 208808 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 2 1958 600 350 Active No Du Chien 208809 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 3 1960800388ActiveYes Du Chien 208807 7 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Resource Type Resource Name MN Unique Year Capacity Well Status of Normal Does this Source (Groundwater, Well # or Installed (Gallons Depth and Emergency have a Dedicated Surface water, Intake ID per (Feet) Operations Emergency Power Interconnection) Minute) Source? Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 4 19621,000418ActiveNo Du Chien 208805 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 5 19671,000358ActiveNo Du Chien 208806 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 6 1973 1,000 427 Active No Du Chien 201238 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 7 1974 1,000 370 Active No Du Chien 201227 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 8 1977 1,500 396 Active Yes Du Chien 110464 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 9 1979 1,500 380 Active Yes Du Chien 165602 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 10 1984 1,800 284 Active Yes Du Chien 191904 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 1120041,500427ActiveYes Du Chien 655944 Groundwater Jordan/Prairie Well No. 1220171,500475ActiveYes Du Chien 830682 Interconnection St. Paul Park - - ~500 - Emergency NA Limits on Emergency Interconnections Discuss any limitations on the use of the water sources (e.g. not to be operated simultaneously, limitations due to blending, aquifer recovery issues etc.) and the use of interconnections, including capacity limits or timing constraints (i.e. only 200 gallons per minute are available from the City of Prior Lake, and it is estimated to take 6 hours to establish the emergency connection). If there are no limitations, list none. th There is a 6 inch pipe connection with the City of St. Paul Park at 85 Street. Cottage Grove and St. Paul Park need to open a closed valve for the emergency interconnection to be active. Proposed connections with the City of Woodbury are anticipated once development occurs closer to the City limits. D.&´³´±¤ $¤¬ ­£ 0±®©¤¢³¨®­² ȟ Key Metropolitan Council Benchmark Water Use Trends Use the data in Table 2 to describe trends in 1) population served; 2) total per capita water demand; 3) average daily demand; 4) maximum daily demand. Then explain the causes for upward or downward trends. For example, over the ten years has the average daily demand trended up or down? Why is this occurring? Population growth in Cottage Grove continues to slowly grow. Population growth since 2005 is less than 1% annually. ƚƷğƌ ƦĻƩ ĭğƦźƷğ ǞğƷĻƩ ķĻƒğƓķ źƭ ķĻĭƩĻğƭźƓŭͳ ŅƩƚƒ ƚǝĻƩ ЊЊЎ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЉЏ Α ЋЉЉВ Ʒƚ ƩƚǒŭŷƌǤ ВЌ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЊЍ Α ЋЉЊЎ͵ The total per capita water demand average was approximately 100 gpcd between 2010 and 2015. Average day water demand has been relatively flat over the last 10 years as per capita water usage has dropped as population has slowly increased. However, the maximum day water demands continue to decrease; from a high of 13.4 MGD in 2005 to less than 10.0 MGD in 2010, 2011, 2014, and 2015. Conservation rates and education have decreased summer irrigation demands. 8 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Use the water use trend information discussed above to complete Table 7 with projected annual demand for the next ten years. Communities in the seven-county Twin Cities metropolitan area must also include projections for 2030 and 2040 as part of their local comprehensive planning. Projected demand should be consistent with trends evident in the historical data in Table 2, as discussed above. Projected demand should also reflect state demographer population projections and/or other planning projections. Table 7. Projected annual water demand Year Projected Projected Projected Total Per Projected Projected Maximum Total Population Capita Water Demand Average Daily Daily Demand Population Served (GPCD) Demand (MGD) (MGD) 2016 36,157 36,080 1003.610.8 2017 36,718 36,660 1003.711.0 2018 37,278 37,240 1003.711.2 2019 37,839 37,820 1003.811.3 2020 38,400 38,400 1003.811.5 2021 38,780 38,780 1003.911.6 2022 39,160 39,160 1003.911.7 2023 39,540 39,540 1004.011.9 2024 39,920 39,920 1004.012.0 2025 40,300 40,300 1004.012.1 2030 42,200 42,200 1004.212.7 2040 47,000 47,000 1004.714.1 GPCD Α DğƌƌƚƓƭ ƦĻƩ /ğƦźƷğ ƦĻƩ 5ğǤ MGD Α aźƌƌźƚƓ DğƌƌƚƓƭ ƦĻƩ 5ğǤ Projection Method Describe the method used to project water demand, including assumptions for population and business growth and how water conservation and efficiency programs affect projected water demand: Population data for 2020, 2030, and 2040 was provided by Metropolitan Council and the remaining years were calculated based on linear population growth. The Metropolitan Council Master Water Supply Plan states all City residents to be served by municipal water by 2020, which is not consistent with City Comprehensive Planning. However, this approach will provide conservative water demands and is used for this Plan. The total per capita water demand average was approximately 100 gpcd between 2010 and 2015. This per capita is projected forward through 2040 as population growth in Cottage Grove increases by one third. Cottage Grove has experienced a drop in per capita water use since the previous water supply plan. The projected maximum day demand was calculated based on a maximum to average day demand ratio of 3.0. The last several years the maximum day demand ratio has been lower, but for planning purposes a conservative approach is preferred. A maximum day demand factor of 3.0 is consistent with previous planning efforts in Cottage Grove and has only been exceeded in 2005 and 2014. 9 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 E.Resource Sustainability Monitoring ȟ +¤¸ $.2 "¤­¢§¬ ±ª Complete Table 8 by inserting information about source water quality monitoring efforts. The list should include all production wells, observation wells, and source water intakes or reservoirs. Additional information on groundwater level monitoring program at: http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/waters/groundwater_section/obwell/index.html Table 8. Information about source water quality monitoring MN Unique Well # Type of monitoring Monitoring programFrequency of Monitoring Method or Surface Water ID point monitoring Well No. 1 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 208808 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 2 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 208809 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 3 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 208807 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 4 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 208805 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 5 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 208806 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 6 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 201238 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually 10 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 MN Unique Well # Type of monitoring Monitoring programFrequency of Monitoring Method or Surface Water ID point monitoring Well No. 7 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 201227 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 8 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 110464 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 9 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 165602 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 10 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 191904 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 11 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 655944 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Well No. 12 production well Routine MDH continuous SCADA 830682 observation well sampling hourly grab sampling source water Routine water daily steel tape intake utility sampling monthly stream gauge source water other quarterly reservoir annually Water Level Data A water level monitoring plan that includes monitoring locations and a schedule for water level readings must be submitted as Appendix 2. If one does not already exist, it needs to be prepared and submitted with the WSP. Ideally, all production and observation wells are monitored at least monthly. Complete Table 9 to summarize water level data for each well being monitored. Provide the name of the aquifer and a brief description of how much water levels vary over the season (the difference between the highest and lowest water levels measured during the year) and the long-term trends for each well. If water levels are not measured and recorded on a routine basis, then provide the static water level when each well was constructed and the most recent water level measured during the same season the well 11 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 was constructed. Also include all water level data taken during any well and pump maintenance. Add rows to the table as needed. Provide water level data graphs for each well in Appendix 3 for the life of the well, or for as many years as water levels have been measured. See DNR website for Date Time Water Level. Table 9. Water level data Unique Well Aquifer Name Seasonal VariationLong-term Trend in Water level Number or Well ID (Feet) water level data measured during well/pumping maintenance Well No. 1 Jordan/Prairie Du ~10ftFalling07/01/14 Α143 ft 208808 Chien Stable ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЎ Α ЊЌВ ŅƷ Rising ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЏ Α ЊЋЎ ŅƷ Well No. 2 Jordan/Prairie Du ~5 ftFalling07/01/14 Α66 ft 208809 Chien Stable ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЎ Α БЍ ŅƷ Rising ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЏ Α БЋ ŅƷ Well No. 3 Jordan/Prairie Du UnknownFallingΑ113 ft 09/2000 208807 Chien Stable ЉВΉЋЉЉЌ Α ЊЍЏ ŅƷ Rising Well No. 4 Jordan/Prairie Du ~10 ftFalling07/01/14 Α126 ft 208805 Chien Stable ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЎ Α ЊЋЏ ŅƷ Rising ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЏ Α ЊЋБ ŅƷ Well No. 5 Jordan/Prairie Du ~10 ftFalling07/01/14 Α71 ft 208806 Chien Stable ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЎ Α АЊ ŅƷ Rising ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЏ Α АЊ ŅƷ Well No. 6 Jordan/Prairie Du UnknownFallingΑ190 ft 09/2003 201238 Chien Stable Rising Well No. 7 Jordan/Prairie Du ~10 ftFalling07/01/14 Α80 ft 201227 Chien Stable ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЎ Α БЋ ŅƷ RisingЉАΉЉЊΉЊЏ Α БЍ ŅƷ Well No. 8 Jordan/Prairie Du ~30 ftFalling07/01/14 Α145ft 110464 Chien Stable ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЎ Α ЊЍЎ ŅƷ Rising ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЏ Α ЊЌВ ŅƷ Well No. 9 Jordan/Prairie Du ~10 ftFallingΑ107 ft 09/2000 165602 Chien Stable ЉЏΉЋЉЉЋ Α ЊЉЎ ŅƷ RisingЉАΉЋЉЊЌ Α ЊЉЏ ŅƷ Well No. 10 Jordan/Prairie Du ~10 ftFalling07/01/14 Α170 ft 191904 Chien Stable ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЎ Α ЊАЉ ŅƷ RisingЉАΉЉЊΉЊЏ Α ЊАЉ ŅƷ Well No. 11 Jordan/Prairie Du ~10 ftFalling07/01/14 Α88ft 655944 Chien Stable ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЎ Α ЊЉЍ ŅƷ Rising ЉАΉЉЊΉЊЏ Α ЊЊЍ ŅƷ TBD TBD Well No. 12 Jordan/Prairie Du 12/05/17Α147ft 830682 Chien 12 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Potential Water Supply Issues & Natural Resource Impacts ȟ +¤¸ $.2 lj -¤³±®¯®«¨³ ­ #®´­¢¨« Benchmark Complete Table 10 by listing the types of natural resources that are or could be impacted by permitted water withdrawals. If known, provide the name of specific resources that may be impacted. Identify what the greatest risks to the resource are and how the risks are being assessed. Identify any resource ƦƩƚƷĻĭƷźƚƓ ƷŷƩĻƭŷƚƌķƭ Α ŅƚƩƒğƌ ƚƩ źƓŅƚƩƒğƌ Α ƷŷğƷ ŷave been established to identify when actions should be taken to mitigate impacts. Provide information about the potential mitigation actions that may be taken, if a resource protection threshold is crossed. Add additional rows to the table as needed. See the glossary at the end of the template for definitions. Some of this baseline data should have been in your earlier water supply plans or county comprehensive water plans. When filling out this table, think of what are the water supply risks, identify the resources, determine the threshold and then determine what your community will do to mitigate the impacts. Your DNR area hydrologist is available to assist with this table. For communities in the seven-county Twin Cities metropolitan area, the Master Water Supply Plan Appendix 1 (Water Supply Profiles, provides information about potential water supply issues and natural resource impacts for your community. Table 10. Natural resource impacts Resource Resource Risk Risk Assessed Describe Mitigation Describe How Type Name Through Resource Measure or Changes to Protection Management Thresholds are Threshold* Plan Monitored River or Flow/water levelGIS analysis Revise stream decline Modeling permit Degrading water Mapping Change quality trends and/or Monitoring groundwater MCLs exceeded Aquifer pumping Impacts on testing Increase endangered, Other: ___ conservation threatened, or special Other concern species habitat or other natural resource impacts Other: _____ Lake Flow/water level GIS analysis Revise decline GIS analysis permit Degrading water Modeling Change quality trends and/or Mapping groundwater MCLs exceeded Monitoring pumping Impacts on Aquifer Increase endangered, testing conservation threatened, or special Other: ___ Other concern species habitat or other natural resource impacts Other: _____ 13 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Resource Resource Risk Risk Assessed Describe Mitigation Describe How Type Name Through Resource Measure or Changes to Protection Management Thresholds are Threshold* Plan Monitored Wetland Flow/water level GIS analysis Revise decline Modeling permit Degrading water Mapping Change quality trends and/or Monitoring groundwater MCLs exceeded Aquifer pumping Impacts on testing Increase endangered, Other: ___ conservation threatened, or special Other concern species habitat or other natural resource impacts Other: _____ Trout Flow/water level GIS analysis Revise Stream decline Modeling permit Degrading water Mapping Change quality trends and/or Monitoring groundwater MCLs exceeded Aquifer pumping Impacts on testing Increase endangered, Other: ___ conservation threatened, or special Other concern species habitat or other natural resource impacts Other: _____ Aquifer Jordan Flow/water level GIS analysis Established Revise DNR has oversight Prairie du decline Modeling threshold permit on thresholds (and Chien Degrading water Mapping guideline is water Change permitting) for Aquifers quality trends and/or Monitoring level drop no groundwater pumping from MCLs exceeded Aquifer more than half of pumping regional bedrock Impacts on testing the available Increase aquifers. endangered, PFC testing head. Law does conservation Water level threatened, or special in new not allow aquifer Water monitoring by City. concern species habitat sentinel well to be pumped so treatment for Met. Council or other natural Other: ___ that a confined PFC regional modeling. resource impacts aquifer becomes PFC Contamination unconfined. PFC concentrations plume (Treatment of MDH determines regularly tested Wells 3 and 10 started health hazard with MDH. in 2017.) levels for PFCs in drinking water. Endangered, threatened, or special concern species habitat, other Natural resource impacts * Examples of thresholds: a lower limit on acceptable flow in a river or stream; water quality outside of an accepted range; a lower limit on acceptable aquifer level decline at one or more monitoring wells; withdrawals that exceed some percent of the total amount available from a source; or a lower limit on acceptable changes to a protected habitat. 14 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Wellhead Protection (WHP) and Source Water Protection (SWP) Plans Complete Table 11 to provide status information about WHP and SWP plans. The emergency procedures in this plan are intended to comply with the contingency plan provisions ƩĻƨǒźƩĻķ źƓ ƷŷĻ aźƓƓĻƭƚƷğ 5ĻƦğƩƷƒĻƓƷ ƚŅ IĻğƌƷŷ͸ƭ Λa5IΜ ‘ĻƌƌŷĻğķ tƩƚƷĻĭƷźƚƓ Λ‘ItΜ tƌğƓ ğƓķ {ǒƩŅğĭĻ Water Protection (SWP) Plan. Table 11. Status of Wellhead Protection and Source Water Protection Plans Plan Type Status Date AdoptedDate for Update WHP In Process February 16, 20172027 Completed Not Applicable SWP In Process N/AN/A Completed Not Applicable WHP Α ‘ĻƌƌŷĻğķ tƩƚƷĻĭƷźƚƓ tƌğƓ SWP Α {ƚǒƩĭĻ ‘ğƷĻƩ tƩƚƷĻĭƷźƚƓ tƌğƓ F.Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) Please note that any wells that received approval under a ten-year permit, but that were not built, are now expired and must submit a water appropriations permit. Adequacy of Water Supply System Complete Table 12 with information about the adequacy of wells and/or intakes, storage facilities, treatment facilities, and distribution systems to sustain current and projected demands. List planned capital improvements for any system components, in chronological order. Communities in the seven- county Twin Cities metropolitan area should also include information about plans through 2040. The assessment can be the general status by category; it is not necessary to identify every single well, storage facility, treatment facility, lift station, and mile of pipe. Please attach your latest Capital Improvement Plan as Appendix 4. Table 12. Adequacy of Water Supply System System Component Planned actionAnticipated Notes Construction Year Wells/Intakes No action planned -adequate-Well 12 constructed in Repair/replacement 2017. Expansion/addition Water Storage Facilities No action planned -adequate2020/21Future Low Pressure Zone Repair/replacement tank to support Industrial Expansion/addition Park growth. Water Treatment Facilities No action planned -adequate FutureAdditional PFC Repair/replacement contamination treatment Expansion/addition at existing wells Distribution Systems (pipes, No action planned -adequate OngoingContinued pipe valves, etc.) Repair/replacement replacement program Expansion/addition and preventative maintenance 15 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 System Component Planned actionAnticipated Notes Construction Year Pressure Zones No action planned -adequate FutureGrowth to the SW will Repair/replacement require a new pressure Expansion/addition zone served by PRVs. Other: No action planned -adequate2017/2018Water Meter Repair/replacement Replacement Project Expansion/addition Proposed Future Water Sources Complete Table 13 to identify new water source installation planned over the next ten years. Add rows to the table as needed. Table 13. Proposed future installations/sources Source Installation Resource ProposedPlanned Planned Location Name Pumping Installation Year Partnerships (approximate) Capacity (gpm) Groundwater NE Cottage Grove Prairie Du 1,5002019 Chien/Jordan Groundwater Business Park Prairie Du 1,500When/If future Chien/Jordan demands justify it. Surface Water N/A Interconnection Woodbury N/A2025 or later City of Woodbury Interconnection Newport N/A2025 or later City of Newport Water Source Alternatives - Key Metropolitan Council Benchmark Do you anticipate the need for alternative water sources in the next 10 years? Yes No For metro communities, will you need alternative water sources by the year 2040? Yes No If you answered yes for either question, then complete table 14. If no, insert NA. Complete Table 14 by checking the box next to alternative approaches that your community is considering, including approximate locations (if known), the estimated amount of future demand that could be met through the approach, the estimated timeframe to implement the approach, potential partnerships, and the major benefits and challenges of the approach. Add rows to the table as needed. For communities in the seven-county Twin Cities metropolitan area, these alternatives should include approaches the community is considering to meet projected 2040 water demand. Table 14. Alternative water sources Alternative Source Source and/or Installation Location Estimated Timeframe to Potential Considered (approximate) Amount of Future Implement Partners Demand (%) (YYYY) Groundwater aĻƷ͵ /ƚǒƓĭźƌ͸ƭ Water Supply Feasibility UnknownUnknown Washington Co. Surface Water Assessment (10/2016) for Washington Met Council Interconnection to County cities evaluated potential water DNR another supplier supply sources including treatment of contaminated groundwater, surface water treatment, connection to other systems, and new wells. 16 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Part 2. Emergency Preparedness Procedures The emergency preparedness procedures outlined in this plan are intended to comply with the contingency plan provisions required by MDH in the WHP and SWP. Water emergencies can occur as a result of vandalism, sabotage, accidental contamination, mechanical problems, power failings, drought, flooding, and other natural disasters. The purpose of emergency planning is to develop emergency response procedures and to identify actions needed to improve emergency preparedness. In the case of a municipality, these procedures should be in support of, and part of, an all-hazard emergency operations plan. Municipalities that already have written procedures dealing with water emergencies should review the following information and update existing procedures to address these water supply protection measures. A.Federal Emergency Response Plan Section 1433(b) of the Safe Drinking Water Act, (Public Law 107-188, Title IV- Drinking Water Security and Safety) requires community water suppliers serving over 3,300 people to prepare an Emergency Response Plan. Do you have a federal emergency response plan? Yes No If yes, what was the date it was certified? ____June 14, 2004___ Complete Table 15 by inserting the noted information regarding your completed Federal Emergency Response Plan. Table 15. Emergency Preparedness Plan contact information Emergency Response Plan Role Contact PersonContact Phone Contact Email Number Emergency Response Lead HARRY TAYLOR651-458-2853HTAYLOR@COTTAGEGROVEMN.GOV Alternate Emergency Response Lead RICK ALT651-458-2842RALT@COTTAGEGROVEMN.GOV B.Operational Contingency Plan All utilities should have a written operational contingency plan that describes measures to be taken for water supply mainline breaks and other common system failures as well as routine maintenance. Do you have a written operational contingency plan? Yes No At a minimum, a water supplier should prepare and maintain an emergency contact list of contractors and suppliers. C.Emergency Response Procedures Water suppliers must meet the requirements of MN Rules 4720.5280 . Accordingly, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) requires public water suppliers serving more than 1,000 people to submit Emergency and Conservation Plans. Water emergency and conservation plans that have been approved by the DNR, under provisions of Minnesota Statute 186 and Minnesota Rules, part 6115.0770, will be considered equivalent to an approved WHP contingency plan. 17 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Emergency Telephone List Prepare and attach a list of emergency contacts, including the MN Duty Officer (1-800-422-0798), as Appendix 5. A template is available at www.mndnr.gov/watersupplyplans The list should include key utility and community personnel, contacts in adjacent water suppliers, and appropriate local, state and federal emergency contacts. Please be sure to verify and update the contacts on the emergency telephone list and date it. Thereafter, update on a regular basis (once a year is recommended). In the case of a municipality, this information should be contained in a notification and warning standard operating procedure maintained by the Emergency Manager for that community. Responsibilities and services for each contact should be defined. Current Water Sources and Service Area Quick access to concise and detailed information on water sources, water treatment, and the distribution system may be needed in an emergency. System operation and maintenance records should be maintained in secured central and back-up locations so that the records are accessible for emergency purposes. A detailed map of the system showing the treatment plants, water sources, storage facilities, supply lines, interconnections, and other information that would be useful in an emergency should also be readily available. It is critical that public water supplier representatives and emergency response personnel communicate about the response procedures and be able to easily obtain this kind of information both in electronic and hard copy formats (in case of a power outage). Do records and maps exist? Yes No Can staff access records and maps from a central secured location in an emergency? Yes No Does the appropriate staff know where the materials are located? Yes No Procedure for Augmenting Water Supplies /ƚƒƦƌĻƷĻ ğĬƌĻƭ ЊЏ Α ЊА ĬǤ ƌźƭƷźƓŭ ğƌƌ ğǝğźƌğĬƌĻ ƭƚǒƩĭĻƭ of water that can be used to augment or replace existing sources in an emergency. Add rows to the tables as needed. In the case of a municipality, this information should be contained in a notification and warning standard operating procedure maintained by the warning point for that community. Municipalities are encouraged to execute cooperative agreements for potential emergency water services and copies should be included in Appendix 6. Outstate Communities may consider using nearby high capacity wells (industry, golf course) as emergency water sources. WSP should include information on any physical or chemical problems that may limit interconnections to other sources of water. Approvals from the MDH are required for interconnections or the reuse of water. Table 16. Interconnections with other water supply systems to supply water in an emergency Other Water Capacity (GPM Note Any Limitations On List of services, equipment, supplies Supply System & MGD) Use available to respond Owner {͵ t! \[ t!wY ЎЉЉ Dta \[LaL95 .— \[h/!\[ Џͼ tLt9{bhb9 Dta Α DğƌƌƚƓƭ ƦĻƩ ƒźƓǒƷĻ aD5 Α ƒźƌƌźƚƓ ŭğƌƌƚƓƭ ƦĻƩ ķğǤ 18 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Table 17. Utilizing surface water as an alternative source Surface Water Capacity Capacity Treatment NeedsNote Any Limitations Source Name (GPM) (MGD) On Use NONE If not covered above, describe additional emergency measures for providing water (obtaining bottled water, or steps to obtain National Guard services, etc.) Allocation and Demand Reduction Procedures Complete Table 18 by adding information about how decisions will be made to allocate water and reduce demand during an emergency. Provide information for each customer category, including its priority ranking, average day demand, and demand reduction potential for each customer category. Modify the customer categories as needed, and add additional lines if necessary. Water use categories should be prioritized in a way that is consistent with Minnesota Statutes 103G.261 (#1 is highest priority) as follows: 1.Water use for human needs such as cooking, cleaning, drinking, washing and waste disposal; use for on-farm livestock watering; and use for power production that meets contingency requirements. 2.Water use involving consumption of less than 10,000 gallons per day (usually from private wells or surface water intakes) 3.Water use for agricultural irrigation and processing of agricultural products involving consumption of more than 10,000 gallons per day (usually from private high-capacity wells or surface water intakes) 4.Water use for power production above the use provided for in the contingency plan. 5.All other water use involving consumption of more than 10,000 gallons per day. 6. bƚƓĻƭƭĻƓƷźğƌ ǒƭĻƭ Α ĭğƩ ǞğƭŷĻƭͲ ŭƚƌŅ ĭƚǒƩƭĻƭͲ ĻƷĭ͵ Water used for human needs at hospitals, nursing homes and similar types of facilities should be designated as a high priority to be maintained in an emergency. Lower priority uses will need to address water used for human needs at other types of facilities such as hotels, office buildings, and manufacturing plants. The volume of water and other types of water uses at these facilities must be carefully considered. After reviewing the data, common sense should dictate local allocation priorities to protect domestic requirements over certain types of economic needs. Water use for lawn sprinkling, vehicle washing, golf courses, and recreation are legislatively considered non-essential. 19 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Table 18. Water use priorities Customer Category Allocation PriorityAverage DailyDemand Short-Term Emergency (GDP) Demand Reduction Potential (GPD) Residential 12,600,0001,040,000 Commercial/Industrial/ 2500,000210,000 Institutional Non-Essential 650,00050,000 TOTAL NA3,150,0001,300,000 GPD Α DğƌƌƚƓƭ ƦĻƩ 5ğǤ Tip: Calculating Emergency Demand Reduction Potential The emergency demand reduction potential for all uses will typically equal the difference between maximum use (summer demand) and base use (winter demand). In extreme emergency situations, lower priority water uses must be restricted or eliminated to protect priority domestic water requirements. Emergency demand reduction potential should be based on average day demands for customer categories within each priority class. Use the tables in Part 3 on water conservation to help you determine strategies. Complete Table 19 by selecting the triggers and actions during water supply disruption conditions. Table 19. Emergency demand reduction conditions, triggers and actions (Select all that may apply and describe) Emergency Triggers Short-term Actions Long-term Actions Supply augmentation through Supply augmentation through Contamination ____ ____ Loss of production Adopt (if not already) and Adopt (if not already) and Infrastructure failure enforce a critical water deficiency enforce a critical water deficiency Executive order by ordinance to penalize lawn ordinance to penalize lawn Governor watering, vehicle washing, golf watering, vehicle washing, golf Other: _________ course and park irrigation & other course and park irrigation & other nonessential uses. nonessential uses. Cut Non-essential water uses. Cut Non-essential water uses. Meet with large water users to Meet with large water users to discuss their contingency plan. discuss their contingency plan. 20 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Notification Procedures Complete Table 20 by selecting trigger for informing customers regarding conservation requests, water use restrictions, and suspensions; notification frequencies; and partners that may assist in the notification process. Add rows to the table as needed. Table 20. Plan to inform customers regarding conservation requests, water use restrictions, and suspensions Notification Methods (select all that apply)Update Partners Trigger(s) Frequency Short-term Website Daily MDH demand reduction Email list serve Weekly Washington County declared (< 1 year) Social media (e.g. Twitter, Facebook) Monthly St. Paul Park Direct customer mailing, Annually Mutual Aid Press release (TV, radio, newspaper), Meeting with large water users (> 10% of total city use) Other: Washington Co. Code Red Long-term Website Daily MDH Ongoing demand Email list serve Weekly Washington County reduction declared Social media (e.g. Twitter, Monthly Metropolitan Council Facebook) Annually DNR Direct customer mailing, Woodbury Press release (TV, radio, St. Paul Water Utility newspaper), Meeting with large water users (> 10% of total city use) Other: Washington Co. Code Red DƚǝĻƩƓƚƩ͸ƭ Website Daily DƚǝĻƩƓƚƩ͸ƭ hŅŅźĭĻ Email list serve Critical water Weekly MDH Social media (e.g. Twitter, Facebook) deficiency declared Monthly Washington County Direct customer mailing, Annually Metropolitan Council Press release (TV, radio, newspaper), DNR Meeting with large water users (> 10% of total city use) Other: Washington Co. Code Red 21 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Enforcement Prior to a water emergency, municipal water suppliers must adopt regulations that restrict water use and outline the enforcement response plan. The enforcement response plan must outline how conditions will be monitored to know when enforcement actions are triggered, what enforcement tools will be used, who will be responsible for enforcement, and what timelines for corrective actions will be expected. Affected operations, communications, and enforcement staff must then be trained to rapidly implement those provisions during emergency conditions. Important Note: Disregard of critical water deficiency orders, even though total appropriation remains less than permitted, is adequate grounds for immediate modifiĭğƷźƚƓ ƚŅ ğ ƦǒĬƌźĭ ǞğƷĻƩ ƭǒƦƦƌǤ ğǒƷŷƚƩźƷǤ͸ƭ ǞğƷĻƩ use permit (2013 MN Statutes 103G.291) Does the city have a critical water deficiency restriction/official control in place that includes provisions to restrict water use and enforce the restrictions? (This restriction may be an ordinance, rule, regulation, policy under a council directive, or other official control) Yes No If yes, attach the official control document to this WSP as Appendix 7. If no, the municipality must adopt such an official control within 6 months of submitting this WSP and submit it to the DNR as an amendment to this WSP. Irrespective of whether a critical water deficiency control is in place, does the public water supply utility, city manager, mayor, or emergency manager have standing authority to implement water restrictions? Yes No If yes, cite the regulatory authority reference: 8-1-9: WATER CONSERVATION: A. Emergency Regulations: The mayor or assigned designee may impose emergency water usage regulations by limiting the times and hours, or completely prohibiting water use of the city's water system for sprinkling lawns, landscaping and gardens, irrigation, and other uses. The mayor or assigned designee must give notice by publication or by posting in the city hall and other public places. If no, who has authority to implement water use restrictions in an emergency? 22 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 PART 3. WATER CONSERVATION PLAN aźƓƓĻƭƚƷğƓƭ ŷğǝĻ ŷźƭƷƚƩźĭğƌƌǤ ĬĻƓĻŅźƷĻķ ŅƩƚƒ ƷŷĻ ƭƷğƷĻ͸ƭ ğĬǒƓķğƓƷ water supplies, reducing the need for conservation. There are Priority 1: Priority 2: Slight however, limits to the available supplies of water and increasing Significant water water reduction, reduction; low low costs (low threats to the quality of our drinking water. Causes of water supply costhanging fruit) limitation may include: population increases, economic trends, uneven statewide availability of groundwater, climatic changes, and degraded water quality. Examples of threats to drinking water Priority 3: Slight quality include: the presence of contaminant plumes from past land Priority 2: water reduction, Significant water significant costs use activities, exceedances of water quality standards from natural reduction; (do only if significant costs and human sources, contaminants of emerging concern, and necessary) increasing pollutant trends from nonpoint sources. There are many incentives for conserving water; conservation: reduces the potential for pumping-induced transfer of contaminants into the deeper aquifers, which can add treatment costs  reduces the need for capital projects to expand system capacity reduces the likelihood of water use conflicts, like well interference, aquatic habitat loss, and declining lake levels conserves energy, because less energy is needed to extract, treat and distribute water (and less energy production also conserves water since water is use to produce energy) maintains water supplies that can then be available during times of drought It is therefore imperative that water suppliers implement water conservation plans. The first step in water conservation is identifying opportunities for behavioral or engineering changes that could be made to reduce water use by conducting a thorough analysis of: Water use by customer Extraction, treatment, distribution and irrigation system efficiencies Industrial processing system efficiencies Regulatory and barriers to conservation Cultural barriers to conservation Water reuse opportunities Once accurate data is compiled, water suppliers can set achievable goals for reducing water use. A successful water conservation plan follows a logical sequence of events. The plan should address both conservation on the supply side (leak detection and repairs, metering), as well as on the demand side (reductions in usage). Implementation should be conducted in phases, starting with the most obvious and lowest-cost options. In some cases one of the early steps will be reviewing regulatory constraints to water conservation, such as lawn irrigation requirements. Outside funding and grants may be available for implementation of projects. Engage water system operators and maintenance staff and customers in brainstorming opportunities to ƩĻķǒĭĻ ǞğƷĻƩ ǒƭĻ͵ !ƭƉ ƷŷĻ ƨǒĻƭƷźƚƓʹ ͻIƚǞ ĭğƓ L ŷĻƌƦ ƭğǝĻ ǞğƷĻƩͪͼ Progress since 2006 Lƭ Ʒŷźƭ ǤƚǒƩ ĭƚƒƒǒƓźƷǤ͸ƭ ŅźƩƭƷ ‘ğƷĻƩ {ǒƦƦƌǤ tƌğƓͪ Yes No If yes, describe conservation practices that you are already implementing, such as: pricing, system improvements, education, regulation, appliance retrofitting, enforcement, etc. 23 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 If no, complete Table 21 to summarize conservation actions taken since the adoption of the 2006 water supply plan. Table 21. Implementation of previous ten-year Conservation Plan 2006 Plan Commitments Action Taken? Change Water Rates Structure to provide conservation pricing Yes No Water Supply System Improvements (e.g. leak repairs, valve replacements, etc.) Yes No Educational Efforts Yes No New water conservation ordinances: Time of Day water restrictions (no irrigating 12 Α4 pm) Yes No Rebate or retrofitting Program (e.g. for toilet, faucets, appliances, showerheads, dish Yes washers, washing machines, irrigation systems, rain barrels, water softeners, etc. No Enforcement Yes No Describe Other: City of Cottage Grove adopted a Water Conservation Plan on 11/16/2016. Yes The City is an active participant in the Washington County Municipal Water No Coalition currently working to evaluate water efficiency across the County. What are the results you have seen from the actions in Table 21 and how were results measured? ƚƷğƌ ƦĻƩ ĭğƦźƷğ ǞğƷĻƩ ķĻƒğƓķ źƭ ķĻĭƩĻğƭźƓŭͳ ŅƩƚƒ ƚǝĻƩ ЊЊЎ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЉЏ Α ЋЉЉВ Ʒƚ ƩƚǒŭŷƌǤ ВЌ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЊЍ Α ЋЉЊЎ͵ The total per capita water demand average was approximately 100 gpcd between 2010 and 2015. Average day water demand has been relatively flat over the last 10 years as per capita water usage has dropped as population has slowly increased. However, the maximum day water demands continue to decrease; from a high of 13.4 MGD in 2005 to less than 10.0 MGD in 2010, 2011, 2014, and 2015. Conservation rates and education have decreased summer irrigation demands. The City of Cottage Grove adopted a Water Conservation Plan on November 16, 2016 which is a guide to water conservation opportunities to meet the objectives laid out for the City in the Master Water Supply Plan. This Plan will help the City improve water conservation measures across all DNR conservation objectives. A.Triggers for Allocation and Demand Reduction Actions Complete table 22 by checking each trigger below, as appropriate, and the actions to be taken at various levels or stages of severity. Add in additional rows to the table as needed. 24 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Table 22. Short and long-term demand reduction conditions, triggers and actions Objective TriggersActions Protect Surface Water Flows Low stream flow conditionsIncrease promotion of conservation Reports of declining measures wetland and lake levels Other: ____________ Short-term demand reduction Extremely high seasonal Enforce the critical water deficiency (less than 1 year) water demand (more than ordinance to restrict or prohibit lawn double winter demand) watering, vehicle washing, golf course Loss of treatment capacity and park irrigation & other nonessential Lack of water in storage uses. State drought plan Supply augmentation through Well interference emergency interconnections. Increased PFC Water allocation through____ concentrations in wells Meet with large water users to discuss ǒƭĻƩ͸ƭ ĭƚƓƷźƓŭĻƓĭǤ ƦƌğƓ͵ Long-term demand reduction Per capita demand Develop acritical water deficiency (>1 year) increasing ordinance that is or can be quickly Total demand increase adopted to penalize lawn watering, (higher population or more vehicle washing, golf course and park industry) irrigation & other nonessential uses. Water level in well(s) below Meet with large water users to discuss elevation of _____ ǒƭĻƩ͸ƭ ĭƚƓƷźƓŭĻƓĭǤ ƦƌğƓ͵ Increased PFC Enhanced monitoring and reporting: concentrations in wells audits, meters, billing, etc. DƚǝĻƩƓƚƩ͸ƭ ͻ/ƩźƷźĭğƌ ‘ğƷĻƩ Determined by StateEnact a water waste ordinance that 5ĻŅźĭźĻƓĭǤ hƩķĻƩͼ ķĻĭƌğƩĻķ targets overwatering (causing water to flow off the landscape into streets, parking lots, or similar), watering impervious surfaces (streets, driveways or other hardscape areas), and negligence of known leaks, breaks, or malfunctions. B.Conservation Objectives and Strategies ȟ +¤¸ ¡¤­¢§¬ ±ª ¥®± $.2 This section establishes water conservation objectives and strategies for eight major areas of water use. Objective 1: Reduce Unaccounted (Non-Revenue) Water loss to Less than 10% The Minnesota Rural Waters Association, the Metropolitan Council and the Department of Natural Resources recommend that all water uses be metered. Metering can help identify high use locations and times, along with leaks within buildings that have multiple meters. It is difficult to quantify specific unmetered water use such as that associated with firefighting and system flushing or system leaks. Typically, water suppliers subtract metered water use from total water pumped to calculate unaccounted or non-revenue water loss. Is your ten-year average (2005-2014) unaccounted Water Use in Table 2 higher than 10%? Yes No What is your leak detection monitoring schedule? Annually Leak Detection occurs annually. Well pumpage is reviewed regularly to monitor for unexpected changes. 25 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Water Audits - are intended to identify, quantify and verify water and revenue losses. The volume of unaccounted-for water should be evaluated each billing cycle. The American Water Works Association (AWWA) recommends that ten percent or less of pumped water is unaccounted-for water. Water audit procedures are available from the AWWA and MN Rural Water Association www.mrwa.com . Drinking Water Revolving Loan Funds are available for purchase of new meters when new plants are built. What is the date of your most recent water audit? _Completed Monthly______ Frequency of water audits: yearly Every billing cycle Leak detection and survey: every year every other year periodic as needed Year last leak detection survey completed: ___2015______ If Table 2 shows annual water losses over 10% or an increasing trend over time, describe what actions will be taken to reach the <10% loss objective and within what timeframe The City is currently completing a 5 year project to replace 7,500 meters in the City to provide more accurate water usage. The City has installed meters at all public institutions to account for that nonrevenue water. Metering -AWWA recommends that every water supplier install meters to account for all water taken into its system, along with all water distributed from źƷƭ ƭǤƭƷĻƒ ğƷ Ļğĭŷ ĭǒƭƷƚƒĻƩ͸ƭ ƦƚźƓƷ ƚŅ ƭĻƩǝźĭĻ͵ !Ɠ effective metering program relies upon periodic performance testing, repair, maintenance or replacement of all meters. AWWA also recommends that water suppliers conduct regular water audits to ensure accountability. Some cities install separate meters for interior and exterior water use, but some research suggests that this may not result in water conservation. Complete Table 23 by adding the requested information regarding the number, types, testing and maintenance of customer meters. Table 23. Information about customer meters Customer Number of Number of Number of Meter testing Average Category Customers Metered Automated intervals age/meter Connections Meter (years) replacement Readers schedule (years) Residential 10,471 10,47110,471As needed3.5/25 Irrigation meters 33 3333As needed3.5/25 Commercial 252 252252As needed3.5/25 Public Facilities 26 2626As needed3.5/25 Other 127 127127As needed3.5/25 TOTALS 10,909 10,90910,909NANA For unmetered systems, describe any plans to install meters or replace current meters with advanced technology meters. Provide an estimate of the cost to implement the plan and the projected water savings from implementing the plan. Not applicable. 26 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Table 24. Water source meters Number of Meter testing Number of Automated Average age/meter Meters schedule (years) Meter Readers replacement schedule (years Water Source 11 Periodically/ 11Well meters were installed in (wells/intakes) every 11 years 1996 and are expected to be replaced within the next 5 years. Objective 2: Achieve Less than 75 Residential Gallons per Capita Demand (GPCD) The 2002 average residential per capita demand in the Twin Cities Metropolitan area was 75 gallons per capita per day. Is your average 2010-2015 residential per capita water demand in Table 2 more than 75? Yes No ‘ŷğƷ Ǟğƭ ǤƚǒƩ ЋЉЉЎ Α ЋЉЊЍ ƷĻƓΏǤĻğƩ ğǝĻƩğŭĻ ƩĻƭźķĻƓƷźğl per capita water demand? 74.8 gal/person/day Describe the water use trend over that timeframe: Residential per capita water demand is decreasing; from over БЍ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЉЏ Α ЋЉЉВ Ʒƚ ƩƚǒŭŷƌǤ ЏВ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЊЍ Α 2015. The Residential per capita water demand average was approximately 75 gpcd between 2010 and 2015. Complete Table 25 by checking which strategies you will use to continue reducing residential per capita demand and project a likely timeframe for completing each checked strategy (Select all that apply and add rows for additional strategies): Table 25. Strategies and timeframe to reduce residential per capita demand Strategy to reduce residential per capita demandTimeframe for completing work Revise city ordinances/codes to encourage or require water efficient 2017/2018 landscaping. Revise city ordinance/codes to permit water reuse options, especially for 2017/2018 non-potable purposes like irrigation, groundwater recharge, and industrial use. Check with plumbing authority to see if internal buildings reuse is permitted Revise ordinances to limit irrigation. Describe the restricted irrigation Restrict watering between 12- plan: 4pm and Odd/even sprinkling ban Revise outdoor irrigation installationscodes to require high efficiency systems (e.g. those with soil moisture sensors or programmable watering areas) in new installations or system replacements. Make water system infrastructure improvements Offer free or reduced cost water use audits) for residential customers. 2017-2020 Implement a notification system to inform customers when water ongoing availability conditions change. Provide rebates or incentives for installing water efficient appliances TBD and/or fixtures indoors (e.g., low flow toilets, high efficiency dish washers and washing machines, showerhead and faucet aerators, water softeners, etc.) Provide rebates or The City of Cottage Grove partnered with Washington County in 2016 to provide incentives to reduce rain barrel and irrigation controller subsidies. The City is currently working with outdoor water use (e.g., turf South Washington Watershed District (SWWD) to provide low cost smart replacement/reduction, rain irrigation controllers to increase outdoor water conservation during peak water gardens, rain barrels, smart ǒƭĻ ƭĻğƭƚƓ͵ ŷĻ /źƷǤ͸ƭ ƓĻǞ ǞğƷĻƩ ƩğƷĻƭ ğƩĻ ƭƷƩǒĭƷǒƩĻķ Ʒƚ ĻƓĭƚǒƩğŭĻ ǞğƷĻƩ irrigation, outdoor water conservation for residential and commercial customers. Additionally, the City use meters, etc.) will continue to work with the Washington Conservation District and the East 27 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Strategy to reduce residential per capita demandTimeframe for completing work Metro Water Resource Education Program (EMWREP) to provide education on water conservation, and SWWD to provide cost participation grants to businesses and residents within the City for water use reduction strategies. The City will continue to pursue opportunities to further water conservation efforts. Identify supplemental Water Resources Conduct audience-appropriate water conservation education &outreach.2017 Add additional rate categories for billing2017/2018 Objective 3: Achieve at least a 1.5% per year water reduction for Institutional, Industrial, Commercial, and Agricultural GPCD over the next 10 years or a 15% reduction in ten years. Complete Table 26 by checking which strategies you will used to continue reducing non-residential customer use demand and project a likely timeframe for completing each checked strategy (add rows for additional strategies). Where possible, substitute recycled water used in one process for reuse in another. (For example, spent rinse water can often be reused in a cooling tower.) Keep in mind the true cost of water is the amount on the water bill PLUS the expenses to heat, cool, treat, pump, and dispose of/discharge the water. 5ƚƓ͸Ʒ ƆǒƭƷ ĭğƌĭǒƌğƷĻ ƷŷĻ źƓźƷźğƌ źƓǝĻƭƷƒĻƓƷ͵ ağƓǤ ĭƚƓƭervation retrofits that appear to be prohibitively expensive are actually very cost-effective when amortized over the life of the equipment. Often reducing water use also saves electrical and other utility costs. Note: as of 2015, water reuse, and is not allowed by the state plumbing code, M.R. 4715 (a variance is needed). However several state agencies are addressing this issue. Table 26. Strategies and timeframe to reduce institutional, commercial industrial, and agricultural and non-revenue use demand Strategy to reduce total business, industry, agricultural demandTimeframe for completing work Conduct a facility water use audit for both indoor and outdoor use, including 2018, seeking MnTAP assistance. system components Install enhanced meters capable of automated readings to detect spikes in Already in place. consumption Compare facility water use to related industry benchmarks, if available (e.g., 2019, pursuing grants to assist meat processing, dairy, fruit and vegetable, beverage, textiles, paper/pulp, large water users with reduction metals, technology, petroleum refining etc.), efforts. Install water conservation fixtures and appliances or change processes to Ongoing, City used a Met. conserve water Council grant for this in 2016. Repair leaking system components (e.g., pipes, valves) Currently audit when needed. Investigate the reuse of reclaimed water (e.g., stormwater, wastewater 2017/2018 effluent, process wastewater, etc.) Reduce outdoor water use (e.g., turf replacement/reduction, rain gardens, Smart irrigation programs rain barrels, smart irrigation, outdoor water use meters, etc.) Train employees how to conserve water 2018, develop a targeted education plan (target ISD833). Implement a notification system to inform non-residential customers when 2017/2018, already partially in water availability conditions change. place. \[Rainwater catchment systems intended to supply uses such as water closets, urinals, trap primers for floor drains and floor sinks, industrial processes, water features, vehicle washing facilities, cooling tower makeup, and similar uses shall be approved by the commissioner.Proposed code 4714.1702.1 Describe other plans: 3M pollution containment efficiencies.Ongoing 28 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Objective 4: Achieve a Decreasing Trend in Total Per Capita Demand Include as Appendix 8 one graph showing total per capita water demand for each customer category (i.e., residential, institutional, commercial, industrial) from 2005-2014 and add the calculated/estimated linear trend for the next 10 years. Describe the trend for each customer category; explain the reason(s) for the trends, and where trends are increasing. ƚƷğƌ ƦĻƩ ĭğƦźƷğ ǞğƷĻƩ ķĻƒğƓķ źƭ ķĻĭƩĻğƭźƓŭͳ ŅƩƚƒ ƚǝĻƩ ЊЊЎ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЉЏ Α ЋЉЉВ Ʒƚ ƩƚǒŭŷƌǤ ВЌ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЊЍ Α ЋЉЊЎ͵ The total per capita water demand average was approximately 100 gpcd between 2010 and 2015. Residential per capita water demand is decreasing; from over БЍ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЉЏ Α ЋЉЉВ Ʒƚ ƩƚǒŭŷƌǤ ЏВ ŭƦĭķ źƓ ЋЉЊЍ Α 2015. The Residential per capita water demand average was approximately 75 gpcd between 2010 and 2015. With the implementation of a new City of Cottage Grove Water Conservation Plan; additional conservation and reduction in per capita water demands is expected. Objective 5: Reduce Peak Day Demand so that the Ratio of Average Maximum day to the Average Day is less than 2.6 Is the ratio of average 2005-2014 maximum day demand to average 2005-2014 average day demand reported in Table 2 more than 2.6? Yes No /ğƌĭǒƌğƷĻ ğ ƷĻƓ ǤĻğƩ ğǝĻƩğŭĻ ΛЋЉЉЎ Α ЋЉЊЍΜ ƚŅ Ʒŷe ratio of maximum day demand to average day demand: __2.75__ The position of the DNR has been that a peak day/average day ratio that is above 2.6 for in summer indicates that the water being used for irrigation by the residents in a community is too large and that efforts should be made to reduce the peak day use by the community. It should be noted that by reducing the peak day use, communities can also reduce the amount of infrastructure that is required to meet the peak day use. This infrastructure includes new wells, new water towers which can be costly items. Objective 6: Implement a Conservation Water Rate Structure and/or a Uniform Rate Structure with a Water Conservation Program Water Conservation Program Municipal water suppliers serving over 1,000 people are required to adopt demand reduction measures that include a conservation rate structure, or a uniform rate structure with a conservation program that achieves demand reduction. These measures must achieve demand reduction in ways that reduce water demand, water losses, peak water demands, and nonessential water uses. These measures must be approved before a community may request well construction approval from the Department of Health or before requesting an increase in water appropriations permit volume (Minnesota Statutes, section 103G.291, subd. 3 and 4). Rates should be adjusted on a regular basis to ensure that revenue of the system is adequate under reduced demand scenarios. If a municipal water supplier intends to use a Uniform Rate Structure, a community-wide Water Conservation Program that will achieve demand reduction must be provided. 29 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Current Water Rates Include a copy of the actual rate structure in Appendix 9 or list current water rates including base/service fees and volume charges below. Volume included in base rate or service charge: __None__ Frequency of billing: Monthly Bimonthly Quarterly Other: _________________ Water Rate Evaluation Frequency: every year every ___ years no schedule Date of last rate change: ___January 1, 2018____ Table 27. Rate structures for each customer category (Select all that apply and add additional rows as needed) Customer Conservation Billing Strategies Conservation NeutralNon-Conserving Billing Category in Use * Billing Strategies in Use ** Strategies in Use *** Residential Monthly Billing Uniform Service charge based on water Increasing block rates Odd/Even day watering volume (volume tiered rates) Declining block Seasonal rates Flat Time of Use rates Other (describe) Water bills reported in gallons Individualized goal rates Excess Use rates Drought surcharge Use water bill to provide comparisons Service charge not based on water volume Other (describe) Commercial/ Monthly Billing Uniform Service charge based on water Industrial/ Increasing block rates volume Institutional Seasonal rates Declining block Time of Use rates Flat Bill water use in gallons Other (describe) Individualized goal rates Excess Use rates Drought surcharge Use water bill to provide comparisons Service charge not based on water volume Other (describe) Other * Rate Structures components that may promote water conservation: Monthly billing: is encouraged to help people see their water usage so they can consider changing behavior. Increasing block rates (also known as a tiered residential rate structure): Typically, these have at least three tiers: should have at least three tiers. 30 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 p The first tier is for the winter average water use. p The second tier is the year-round average use, which is lower than typical summer use. This rate should be set to cover the full cost of service. p The third tier should be above the average annual use and should be priced high enough to encourage conservation, as should any higher tiers. For this to be effective, the difference in block rates should be significant. Seasonal rate: higher rates in summer to reduce peak demands Time of Use rates: lower rates for off peak water use Bill water use in gallons: this allows customers to compare their use to average rates Individualized goal rates: typically used for industry, business or other large water users to promote water conservation if they keep within agreed upon goals. Excess Use rates: if water use goes above an agreed upon amount this higher rate is charged Drought surcharge: an extra fee is charged for guaranteed water use during drought Use water bill to provide comparisons: simple graphics comparing individual use over time or compare individual use to others. Service charge or base fee that does not include a water volume Α ğ ĬğƭĻ ĭŷğƩŭĻ ƚƩ ŅĻĻ Ʒƚ ĭƚǝĻƩ ǒƓźǝĻƩƭğƌ city expenses that are not customer dependent and/or to provide minimal water at a lower rate (e.g., an amount less than the average residential per capita demand for the water supplier for the last 5 years) Emergency rates -A community may have a separate conservation rate that only goes into effect when the community or governor declares a drought emergency. These higher rates can help to protect the city budgets during times of significantly less water usage. **Conservation Neutral** Uniform rate: rate per unit used is the same regardless of the volume used Odd/even day watering Αŷźƭ ğƦƦƩƚğĭŷ ƩĻķǒĭĻƭ ƦĻğƉ ķĻƒğƓķ ƚƓ a daily basis for system operation, but it does not reduce overall water use. *** Non-Conserving *** Service charge or base fee with water volume: an amount of water larger than the average residential per capita demand for the water supplier for the last 5 years Declining block rate: the rate per unit used decreases as water use increases. Flat rate: one fee regardless of how much water is used (usually unmetered). Provide justification for any conservation neutral or non-conserving rate structures. If intending to adopt a conservation rate structure, include the timeframe to do so: While conservation neutral, Odd/Even day watering reduces peak water usage, reducing infrastructure needs required to meet peak demands. The new tiered water rate structure encourages water conservation by decreasing the gap between tiers and adding a fourth tier with a use surcharge designed to encourage water efficiency/conservation. Additionally, the commercial/industrial water rates will have base fees set according to service sizes, rather than a flat fee and increased rates for dedicated irrigation services. 31 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Objective 7: Additional strategies to Reduce Water Use and Support Wellhead Protection Planning Development and redevelopment projects can provide additional water conservation opportunities, such as the actions listed below. If a Uniform Rate Structure is in place, the water supplier must provide a Water Conservation Program that includes at least two of the actions listed below. Check those actions that you intent to implement within the next 10 years. Table 28. Additional strategies to Reduce Water Use & Support Wellhead Protection Participate in the GreenStep Cities Program, including implementation of at least one of the 20 ͻ.ĻƭƷ tƩğĭƷźĭĻƭͼ ŅƚƩ ǞğƷĻƩ Prepare a Master Plan for Smart Growth (compact urban growth that avoids sprawl) Prepare a Comprehensive Open Space Plan (areas for parks, green spaces, natural areas) Adopt a Water Use Restriction Ordinance (lawn irrigation, car washing, pools, etc.) Adopt an Outdoor Lawn Irrigation Ordinance Adopt a Private well Ordinance (private wells in a city must comply with water restrictions) Implement a Stormwater Management Program Adopt Non-Zoning Wetlands Ordinance (can further protect wetlands beyond state/federal laws-for vernal pools, buffer areas, restrictions on filling or alterations) Adopt a Water Offset Program (primarily for new development or expansion) Implement a Water Conservation Outreach Program Hire a Water Conservation Coordinator (part-time) Implement a Rebate program for water efficient appliances, fixtures, or outdoor water management Other Objective 8: Tracking Success: How will you track or measure success through the next ten years? Cottage Grove will track per capita water demand on a regular basis to confirm the conservation trend. The City of Cottage Grove adopted a Water Conservation Plan on November 16, 2016 which is a guide to water conservation opportunities to meet the objectives laid out for the City in the Master Water Supply Plan. This Plan will help the City improve water conservation measures across all DNR conservation objectives. The City is an active participant in the Washington County Municipal Coalition and has been working with peer communities on key issues related to groundwater use, water conservation, and water resource alternatives for the greater Washington County area. Tip: The process to monitor demand reduction and/or a rate structure includes: a)The DNR District Hydrologist or Groundwater Appropriation Hydrologist will call or visit the community the first 1-3 years after the water supply plan is completed. b)They will discuss what activities the community is doing to conserve water and if they feel their actions are successful. The Water Supply Plan, Part 3 tables and responses will guide the discussion. For example, they will discuss efforts to reduce unaccounted for water loss if that is a problem, or go through Tables 33, 34 and 35 to discuss new initiatives. c)The city representative and the hydrologist will discuss total per capita water use, residential per capita water use, and business/industry use. They will note trends. 32 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 d)They will also discuss options for improvement and/or collect case studies of success stories to share with other communities. One option may be to change the rate structure, but there are many other paths to successful water conservation. e)If appropriate, they will cooperatively develop a simple work plan for the next few years, targeting a couple areas where the city might focus efforts. A.Regulation Complete Table 29 by selecting which regulations are used to reduce demand and improve water efficiencies. Add additional rows as needed. Copies of adopted regulations or proposed restrictions or should be included in Appendix 10 (a list with hyperlinks is acceptable). Table 29. Regulations for short-term reductions in demand and long-term improvements in water efficiencies Regulations Utilized When is it applied (in effect)? Rainfall sensors required on landscape irrigation systemsOngoing Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Water efficient plumbing fixtures requiredNew Development Replacement Rebate Programs Critical/Emergency Water Deficiency ordinanceOnlyduring declared Emergencies Watering restriction requirements (time of day, allowable days, etc.)Odd/Even 2 days/week Only during declared Emergencies Water waste prohibited (for example, having a fine for irrigators Ongoing spraying on the street) Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Limitations on turf areas (requiring lots to have 10% -25% of the New Development space in natural areas) Shoreland/zoning Other Soil preparation requirement s (after construction, requiring topsoil New Development to be applied to promote good root growth) Construction Projects Other Tree ratios (requiring a certain number of trees per square foot of New development lawn) Shoreland/zoning Other Permit to fill swimming pool and/or requiring pools to be covered (to Ongoing prevent evaporation) Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Ordinances that permit stormwater irrigation, reuse of water, or We encourage and allow but do not other alternative water use (Note: be sure to check current plumbing have an ordinance language to it. All codes for updates) request must comply with Minnesota State Plumbing Code. 33 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 B.Retrofitting Programs Education and incentive programs aimed at replacing inefficient plumbing fixtures and appliances can help reduce per capita water use, as well as energy costs. It is recommended that municipal water suppliers develop a long-term plan to retrofit public buildings with water efficient plumbing fixtures and appliances. Some water suppliers have developed partnerships with organizations having similar conservation goals, such as electric or gas suppliers, to develop cooperative rebate and retrofit programs. A study by the AWWA Research Foundation (Residential End Uses of Water, 1999) found that the average indoor water use for a non-conserving home is 69.3 gallons per capita per day (gpcd). The average indoor water use in a conserving home is 45.2 gpcd and most of the decrease in water use is related to water efficient plumbing fixtures and appliances that can reduce water, sewer and energy costs. In Minnesota, certain electric and gas providers are required (Minnesota Statute 216B.241) to fund programs that will conserve energy resources and some utilities have distributed water efficient showerheads to customers to help reduce energy demands required to supply hot water. Retrofitting Programs Complete Table 30 by checking which water uses are targeted, the outreach methods used, the measures used to identify success, and any participating partners. Table 30. Retrofitting programs (Select all that apply) Water Use Targets Outreach MethodsPartners low flush toilets, Education aboutGas company toilet leak tablets, free distribution of Electric company low flow showerheads, rebate for Watershed organization faucet aerators; other water conserving washing machines, Education aboutGas company dish washers, free distribution of Electric company water softeners; rebate for Watershed organization other rain gardens, Education aboutGas company rain barrels, free distribution of Electric company Native/drought tolerant landscaping, etc. rebate for Watershed organization other Briefly discuss measures of success from the above table (e.g. number of items distributed, dollar value of rebates, gallons of water conserved, etc.): In 2017 the City distributed 36 smart irrigation controllers for residential irrigation systems with the use of grant money provided by Washington County. In 2018, the City plans to distribute at least 200 more smart irrigation controllers for residential use. The objective of the irrigation controller program is to reduce water ĭƚƓƭǒƒƦƷźƚƓ ĬǤ ƩĻƭźķĻƓƷźğƌ ǒƭĻƩƭͲ ƷŷĻ /źƷǤ͸ƭ ƌğƩŭĻƭƷ water users. Properly installed smart irrigation controllers can reduce water use considerably. The City will begin comparing annual water usage to track water conservation improvements as they relate to distribution of the smart irrigation controllers. 34 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 C.Education and Information Programs Customer education should take place in three different circumstances. First, customers should be provided information on how to conserve water and improve water use efficiencies. Second, information should be provided at appropriate times to address peak demands. Third, emergency notices and educational materials about how to reduce water use should be available for quick distribution during an emergency. Proposed Education Programs Complete Table 31 by selecting which methods are used to provide water conservation and information, including the frequency of program components. Select all that apply and add additional lines as needed. Table 31. Current and Proposed Education Programs Education Methods General summary of #/Year Frequency topics Billing inserts or tips printed on the actual billBilling summary, 12 Ongoing comparing usage to prior Seasonal months, conservation tips Only during declared emergencies Consumer Confidence Reports Included in water bill1 Ongoing Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Press releases to traditional local news outlets Press releases and 4 Ongoing (e.g., newspapers, radio and TV) reminders be sent out to Seasonal SWC Bulletin and SWCTC Only during channel declared Emergencies Social media distribution (e.g., emails, UtilizeFacebook and periodic Ongoing Facebook, Twitter) Instagram to push out Seasonal educational posts and Only during reminders to residents. declared Emergencies Paid advertisements (e.g., billboards, print Our Cottage Grove Ongoing media, TV, radio, web sites, etc.) Reports videos Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Presentations to community groups League of Women Voters; Ongoing Environmental Seasonal Commission; Public Only during Services Commission declared Emergencies Staff training Ongoing Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Facility tours Ongoing Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies 35 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Education Methods General summary of #/Year Frequency topics Displays and exhibits Public Works Open House Ongoing Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Marketing rebate programs (e.g., indoor Rebate programs through Ongoing fixtures & appliances and outdoor practices) grants to improve water Seasonal efficiency. Received Met Only during Council Water Efficiency declared Emergencies Grant in 2015. Community news letters UtźƌźǩĻ ƷŷĻ /źƷǤ͸ƭ ƨǒğƩƷĻƩƌǤ 4 Ongoing newsletters and billing Seasonal inserts to better educate Only during residents on water usage. declared Emergencies Direct mailings (water audit/retrofit kits, Proposed to be included in Ongoing showerheads, brochures) monthly water bills Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Information kiosk at utility and public Ongoing buildings Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Public Service Announcements Proposed Ongoing Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies /ğĬƌĻ  tƩƚŭƩğƒƭ ƷźƌźǩźƓŭ ƷŷĻ /źƷǤ͸ƭ ƒƚƓƷŷƌǤ 2 Ongoing programs on the South Seasonal Washington County Only during Telecommunications declared Emergencies Commission Cable channel Demonstration projects (landscaping or City Hall water reuse Ongoing plumbing) system; Watershed Seasonal district; Only during declared Emergencies K-12 Education programs (Project Wet, CLIMB Theatre for grades Ongoing nd . Seasonal Drinking Water Institute, presentations) K-2 Only during declared Emergencies /ƚƒƒǒƓźƷǤ 9ǝĻƓƷƭ ΛĭŷźƌķƩĻƓ͸ƭ ǞğƷĻƩ ŅĻƭƷźǝğƌƭͲ Safety Camp, Public Works 3 Ongoing environmental fairs) Open House, East Metro Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Community education classes East Metro Water Ongoing Resources Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Water Week promotions Ongoing Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies 36 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Education Methods General summary of #/Year Frequency topics Website Have water conservation Always Ongoing (www.cottagegrovemn.gov/environment/ information and Seasonal water-conservation) ordinances on website Only during declared Emergencies Targeted efforts (large volume users, users Using monthly water bills Always Ongoing with large increases) to determine if a customer Seasonal is using drastically more Only during than normal. declared Emergencies Notices of ordinances All ordinances are posted Ongoing on the website but can Seasonal remind residents through Only during social media. declared Emergencies Emergency conservation ƓƚƷźĭĻƭ ƷźƌźǩĻ ƷŷĻ /źƷǤ͸ƭ /ƩźƷźĭğƌ As Ongoing Deficiency ordinance. Needed Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Other: Ongoing Seasonal Only during declared Emergencies Briefly discuss what future education and information activities your community is considering in the future: Would like to do more with website and social media; voluntary water audits; retrofit program; and enforcement using educational door hangers to residents in violation of water conservation codes. The City of Cottage Grove adopted a Water Conservation Plan on November 16, 2016 which is a guide to water conservation opportunities to meet the objectives laid out for the City in the Master Water Supply Plan. This Plan will help the City improve water conservation measures across all DNR conservation objectives. The City is an active participant in the Washington County Municipal Water Coalition currently working to evaluate water efficiency across the County while identifying water savings and educational opportunities. 37 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Part 4. ITEMS FOR METROPOLITAN AREA COMMUNITIES Minnesota Statute 473.859 requires WSPs to be completed for all local units of government in the seven-county Metropolitan Area as part of the local comprehensive planning process. Much of the information in Parts 1-3 addresses water demand for the next 10 years. However, additional information is needed to address water demand through 2040, which will make the WSP consistent with the Metropolitan Land Use Planning Act, upon which the local comprehensive plans are based. This Part 4 provides guidance to complete the WSP in a way that addresses plans for water supply through 2040. A.Water Demand Projections through 2040 Complete Table 7 in Part 1D by filling in information about long-term water demand projections through 2040. Total Community Population projections should be consistent with ƷŷĻ ĭƚƒƒǒƓźƷǤ͸ƭ ƭǤƭƷĻƒ ƭƷğƷĻƒĻƓƷͲ Ǟŷźĭŷ ĭğƓ ĬĻ ŅƚǒƓķ ƚƓ ƷŷĻ aĻƷƩƚƦƚƌźƷğƓ /ƚǒƓĭźƌ͸ƭ ǞĻĬƭźƷĻ ğƓķ Ǟŷźĭŷ Ǟğƭ ƭĻƓƷ Ʒƚ ƷŷĻ community in September 2015. Projected Average Day, Maximum Day, and Annual Water Demands may either be calculated using the method outlined in Appendix 2 of the 2015 Master Water Supply Plan or by a method developed by the individual water supplier. B.Potential Water Supply Issues Complete Table 10 in Part 1E by providing information about the potential water supply issues in your community, including those that might occur due to 2040 projected water use. The Master Water Supply Plan provides information about potential issues for your community in Appendix 1 (Water Supply Profiles). This resource may be useful in completing Table 10. You may document results of local work done to evaluate impact of planned uses by attaching a feasibility assessment or providing a citation and link to where the plan is available electronically. C.Proposed Alternative Approaches to Meet Extended Water Demand Projections Complete Table 12 in Part 1F with information about potential water supply infrastructure impacts (such as replacements, expansions or additions to wells/intakes, water storage and treatment capacity, distribution systems, and emergency interconnections) of extended plans for development and redevelopment, in 10-year increments through 2040. It may be useful to refer to information in the ĭƚƒƒǒƓźƷǤ͸ƭ ƌƚĭğƌ \[ğƓķ Use Plan, if available. Complete Table 14 in Part 1F by checking each approach your community is considering to meet future demand. For each approach your community is considering, provide information about the amount of future water demand to be met using that approach, the timeframe to implement the approach, potential partners, and current understanding of the key benefits and challenges of the approach. 38 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 As challenges are being discussed, consider the need for: evaluation of geologic conditions (mapping, aquifer tests, modeling), identification of areas where domestic wells could be impacted, measurement and analysis of water levels & pumping rates, triggers & associated actions to protect water levels, etc. D.Value-Added Water Supply Planning Efforts (Optional) The following information is not required to be completed as part of the local water supply plan, but completing this can help strengthen source water protection throughout the region and help Metropolitan Council and partners in the region to better support local efforts. Source Water Protection Strategies Does a Drinking Water Supply Management Area for a neighboring public water supplier overlap your community? Yes No If you answered no, skip this section. If you answered yes, please complete Table 32 with information about new water demand or land use planning-related local controls that are being considered to provide additional protection in this area. Table 32. Local controls and schedule to protect Drinking Water Supply Management Areas Local Control Schedule to Potential Partners Implement None at this time Comprehensive planning that guides development in 2018 City of Newport vulnerable drinking water supply management areas City of St. Paul Park Zoning overlay Other: Technical assistance CƩƚƒ ǤƚǒƩ ĭƚƒƒǒƓźƷǤ͸ƭ ƦĻƩƭƦĻĭƷźǝĻͲ ǞŷğƷ ğƩĻ ƷŷĻ ƒƚƭƷ important topics for the Metropolitan Council to ğķķƩĻƭƭͲ ŭǒźķĻķ ĬǤ ƷŷĻ ƩĻŭźƚƓ͸ƭ aĻƷƩƚƦƚƌźƷğƓ !Ʃea Water Supply Advisory Committee and Technical Advisory Committee, as part of its ongoing water supply planning role? Coordination of state, regional and local water supply planning roles Regional water use goals Water use reporting standards Regional and sub-regional partnership opportunities Identifying and prioritizing data gaps and input for regional and sub-regional analyses Others: Statewide/region wide water conservation programs should be considered. It would increase efficiency of time and produce a better result when multiple cities are able to plan together rather as individuals. Increased grant and funding opportunities can help us and other cities better achieve our water conservation goals. 39 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 APPENDICES TO BE SUBMITTED BY THE WATER SUPPLIER Appendix 1: Well records and maintenance summaries Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Њ/ Appendix 2: Water level monitoring plan Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Њ9 Appendix 3: Water level graphs for each water supply well Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Њ9 Appendix 4: Capital Improvement Plan Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Њ9 Appendix 5: Emergency Telephone List Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Ћ/ Appendix 6: Cooperative Agreements for Emergency Services Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Ћ/ Appendix 7: Municipal Critical Water Deficiency Ordinance Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Ћ/ Appendix 8: Graph showing annual per capita water demand for each customer category during the last ten-years Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Ќ hĬƆĻĭƷźǝĻ Ѝ Appendix 9: Water Rate Structure Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Ќ hĬƆĻĭƷźǝĻ Џ Appendix 10: Adopted or proposed regulations to reduce demand or improve water efficiency Α ƭĻĻ tğƩƷ Ќ hĬƆĻĭƷźǝĻ А Appendix 11: Implementation Checklist Α ƭǒƒƒğƩǤ ƚŅ ğƌƌ ƷŷĻ ğĭƷźƚƓƭ ƷŷğƷ ğ ĭƚƒƒǒƓźƷǤ is doing, or proposes to do, including estimated implementation dates 40 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 APPENDICES TO BE SUBMITTED BY THE WATER SUPPLIER Appendix 1: Well records and maintenance summaries Appendix 2: Water level monitoring plan Appendix 3: Water level graphs for each water supply well Appendix 4: Capital Improvement Plan - Appendix 5: Emergency Telephone List Appendix 6: Cooperative Agreements for Emergency Services Appendix 7: Municipal Critical Water Deficiency Ordinance Appendix 8: Graph showing annual per capita water demand for each customer category during the last ten-years Appendix 9: Water Rate Structure Appendix 10: Adopted or proposed regulations to reduce demand or improve water efficiency Appendix 11: Implementation Checklis³ ȟ ²´¬¬ ±¸ ®¥  «« ³§¤  ¢³¨®­² ³§ ³   community is doing, or proposes to do, including estimated implementation dates Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 1: Well records and maintenance summaries WELL #12 Drilled December 2017 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 2: Water level monitoring plan June 2018 Update The City collects hourly water level data from each production well as requested by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The City upgraded the existing SCADA system and level monitoring equipment at all production wells, in 2018, to collect the requested hourly data. The SCADA system was programmed to export the data requested by DNR (sample data is included below). City staff will complete monthly water level measurements by hand to verify automatic readings. MN Unique Well Aquifer Name Year Installed Well Depth Proposed Monitoring Monitoring Number (Feet) Equipment Frequency Well No. 1 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1958 352 Pressure transducer Hourly 208808 and SCADA Well No. 2 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1958 350 Pressure transducer Hourly 208809 and SCADA Well No. 3 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1960 388 Pressure transducer Hourly 208807 and SCADA Well No. 4 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1962 418 Pressure transducer Hourly 208805 and SCADA Well No. 5 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1967 358 Pressure transducer Hourly 208806 and SCADA Well No. 6 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1973 427 Pressure transducer Hourly 201238 and SCADA Well No. 7 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1974 370 Pressure transducer Hourly 201227 and SCADA Well No. 8 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1977 396 Pressure transducer Hourly 110464 and SCADA Well No. 9 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1979 380 Pressure transducer Hourly 165602 and SCADA Well No. 10 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 1984 284 Pressure transducer Hourly 191904 and SCADA Well No. 11 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 2004 427 Pressure transducer Hourly 655944 and SCADA Well No. 12 Jordan/Prairie Du Chien 2018 475 Pressure transducer Hourly 830682 and SCADA Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 3: Water level graphs for each water supply well Each well is pulled for maintenance every 11 years. The City pulls 1 well per year. The SCADA system measures the water level daily. Currently the SCADA system is giving inaccurate readings in wells 3, 6 and 9. Those are scheduled to be fixed when that well is scheduled to be pulled. We have water level data for each well dating back to 2011. Well #1 - 208808 Well #1 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 Water Level (Feet) 0 Axis Title Well #1Linear (Well #1) Well #2 - 208809 Well #2 100 80 60 40 20 Water Level (Feet) 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Well #2Linear (Well #2) Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Well #3 - 208807 Well #3 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 Water Level (Feet) 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Well #3 Well #4 -208805 Well #4 250 200 150 100 50 Water Level (Feet) 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Well #4Linear (Well #4) Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Well #5 -208806 Well #5 600 500 400 300 200 Water Level (Feet)100 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Well #5 Well #6 - 201238 Well #6 300 250 200 150 100 Water Level (Feet) 50 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Well #7 - 201227 Well #7 250 200 150 100 50 Water Level (Feet) 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Well #8 - 110464 Well #8 200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 Water Level (Feet) 20 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Well #9 - 165602 Well #9 350 300 250 200 150 100 Water Level (feet) 50 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Well #10 - 191904 Well #10 200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 Water Level (Feet( 20 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Well #11 - 655944 Well #11 200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 Water Level (Feet) 20 0 1/1/20114/1/20117/1/20111/1/20124/1/20127/1/20121/1/20134/1/20137/1/20131/1/20144/1/20147/1/20141/1/20154/1/20157/1/20151/1/20164/1/20167/1/2016 10/1/201110/1/201210/1/201310/1/201410/1/2015 Date Well Levels 2011-2016 (Feet) 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1/1/20113/1/20115/1/20117/1/20119/1/20111/1/20123/1/20125/1/20127/1/20129/1/20121/1/20133/1/20135/1/20137/1/20139/1/20131/1/20143/1/20145/1/20147/1/20149/1/20141/1/20153/1/20155/1/20157/1/20159/1/201 51/1/20163/1/20165/1/20167/1/2016 11/1/201111/1/201211/1/201311/1/201411/1/2015 Well #1Well #2Well #3Well #4Well #5Well #6 Well #7Well #8Well #9Well #10Well #11 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 4: Capital Improvement Plan Water CIP 2014-2019 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Water Meter Replacement project $225,000 $206,250 $206,250$225,000 0 0 Pull well - annual maintenance $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 Repaint interior & exterior of Water $605,000 $730,000 0 0 0 0 tower Well #12 0 0 0 0 $150,000$1,500,000 Water CIP 2017-2022 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Water Meter Replacement $203,000 $405,000 Project Pull Well /Maintenance $21,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 Well 12 $90,397 $2,100,000 ‘ğƷĻƩ ƚǞĻƩ Α .ǒƭźƓĻƭƭ tğƩƉ υЌͲЉЉЉͲЉЉЉ Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 5: Emergency Telephone List 7/11/16 Emergency Response Team NameWork Telephone Alternate Telephone Emergency Response Lead Rick Alt 651-458-2842 Alternate Emergency Response Charlene Stevens 651-458-2822 Lead Water Operator Rick Alt651-458-2842 Alternate Water Operator Les Burshten651-458-2810 Public Communications Sharon Madsen651-458-2882 State and Local Emergency NameWork Telephone Alternate Telephone Response Contacts State Incident Duty Officer Minnesota Duty Officer800/422-0798 Out State651-649-5451 Metro County Emergency Director Doug Berglund651-430-7682 National Guard Minnesota Duty Officer800/422-0798 Out State651-649-5451 Metro Mayor/Board Chair Myron Bailey651-459-4734 Fire Chief Rick Redenius651-458-2855 Sheriff WilliamM. Hutton651-439-9381 Police Chief Craig Woolery651-458-2850 Ambulance Regina Hospital651-480-4100 Hospital Regina Hospital651-480-4100 Doctor or Medical Facility HealthEast: Cottage Grove Clinic651-326-5800 State and Local Agencies NameWork Telephone Alternate Telephone MDH District Engineer Gennadiy Begelman651-201-5000 MDH Drinking Water Protection 651-201-4700 State Testing Laboratory Minnesota Duty Officer800/422-0798 Out State651-649-5451 Metro MPCA Environmental Emergencies 800-422-0798 Hotline (24 Hours) DNR Area Hydrologist Jen Sorensen651-259-5754 County Water Planner Washington County Public Health 651-430-6655 and Environment Department Utilities NameWork Telephone Alternate Telephone Electric Company Xcel Energy1-800-895-2999 Gas Company Xcel Energy 1-800-295-2999 CenterPoint612-372-5050800-296-9815 Telephone Company CenturyLink Comcast Hughesnet DIRECTV Gopher State One Call Utility Locations800-252-1166651-454-0002 Highway Department MNDOT651-296-3000 Mutual Aid Agreements NameWork Telephone Alternate Telephone Neighboring Water System St. Paul Park651-459-9785 Emergency Water Connection St. Paul Park651-459-9785 Materials Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Technical/Contracted NameWork Telephone Alternate Telephone Services/Supplies MRWA Technical Services MN Rural Water Association800-367-6792 Well Driller/Repair E.H. Renner and Sons763-427-6100 Pump Repair Traut Wells763-427-6100 Electrician Park Grove Electric651-459-8888 Plumber Rumpca Services Inc.651-459-2896 Backhoe Rumpca Enterprise651-459-2931 Chemical Feed Meter Repair Mantyla Well Drilling651-436-7600 Generator Allied Generators651-770-3483 Valves Duncan Co.612-331-1776 Pipe & Fittings Duncan Co.612-331-1776 Water Storage Laboratory Engineering firm Stantec CommunicationsNameWork Telephone Alternate Telephone News Paper South Washington County 651-319-4280 Bulletin Radio Station WCCORadio612-370-0611 School Superintendent Keith Jacobus651-425-6201 Property & Casualty Insurance Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 6: Cooperative agreements for emergency services Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 7: Municipal Critical Water Deficiency Ordinances 8-1-9: WATER CONSERVATION: A. Emergency Regulations: The mayor or assigned designee may impose emergency water usage regulations by limiting the times and hours, or completely prohibiting water use of the city's water system for sprinkling lawns, landscaping and gardens, irrigation, and other uses. The mayor or assigned designee must give notice by publication or by posting in the city hall and other public places. Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 8: Graph showing annual per capita water demand for each customer category during the last ten years Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 9: Water Rate Structure Summary of Water Rates Water Rates per month As of January 1, 2018 Residential, Base Charge Single Family$2.25 Multi-Family (per REU) $1.69 Residential, Usage Usage up to 6,000 gals/mo. $1.18/1,000gals Usage from 6,001-9,000 gals/mo. $1.44/1,000gals Usage from 9,001-12,000 gallons/mo.$1.83/1,000gals Usage over 12,001 gallons/mo. $2.42/1,000gals Commercial, Base Charge 0.5 inches meter size $2.25 0.625 inches meter size $2.25 0.75 inches meter size $2.25 1.0 inches meter size $9.00 1.5 inches meter size $18.00 2.0 inches meter size $27.00 3.0 inches meter size $31.50 4.0 inches meter size $45.00 6.0 inches meter size $112.50 Commercial, Usage (non-irrigation) Usage up to 6,000 gals/mo. $1.18/1,000gals Usage from 6,001-9,000 gals/mo. $1.44/1,000gals Usage from 9,001-12,000 gals/mo. $1.83/1,000gals Usage over 12,001 gals/mo. $2.42/1,000gals Commercial, Usage (irrigation) Usage up to 6,000 gals/mo. $1.44/1,000gals Usage from 6,001-9,000 gals/mo. $1.84/1,000gals Usage from 9,001-12,000/gals/mo. $2.43/1,000gals Usage over 12,001 gals/mo. $3.32/1,000gals Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 Appendix 10: Adopted or proposed regulations to reduce demand or improve water efficiency 8-1-9: WATER CONSERVATION: A. Emergency Regulations: The mayor or assigned designee may impose emergency water usage regulations by limiting the times and hours, or completely prohibiting water use of the city's water system for sprinkling lawns, landscaping and gardens, irrigation, and other uses. The mayor or assigned designee must give notice by publication or by posting in the city hall and other public places. B. Watering Lawns And Gardens: 1. The watering and sprinkling of lawns and/or gardens from a municipal water supply system shall be permitted on even numbered days for property with even numbered addresses and on odd numbered days for property with odd numbered addresses; except, that any property may be watered on the thirty first day of any month. 2. Outdoor watering is prohibited between the hours of twelve o'clock (12:00) noon and four o'clock (4:00) P.M. 3. The foregoing limitations shall apply only to property served by city water. 4. Fees for violating a watering ban or the restrictions imposed by this subsection are established by city council resolution. C. Exempt Watering Activities: 1. Hand watering flower beds, washing vehicles, and water apparatus' used by children playing are exempt from the even-odd day and time of day watering bans. 2. Watering lawns and landscaping for the first thirty (30) days after the establishment or planting of new lawns or landscaping is permitted with a permit from public works. (Ord. 909, 12-19-2012) D. Leak In Service Line: Any owner, occupant, or user of premises who shall discover a leak in a service line to the premises shall notify the public works department within twenty four (24) hours. Any water wasted due to failure of such person to comply with this regulation shall be estimated by the city water and wastewater division and be charged against the owner of such premises at the established rate. (Ord. 672, 11-17-1999; amd. 2000 Code; Ord. 909, 12-19-2012) Cottage Grove Local Water Supply Plan December 2016 !ƦƦĻƓķźǣ ЊЊʹ LƒƦƌĻƒĻƓƷğƷźƚƓ /ŷĻĭƉƌźƭƷ Α ƭǒƒƒğƩǤ ƚŅ ğƌƌ ƷŷĻ ğĭƷźƚƓƭ ƷŷğƷ ğ ĭƚƒƒǒƓźƷǤ źƭ ķƚźƓŭͲ ƚƩ proposes to do, including estimated implementation dates. Water Conservation Action Implementation Status/Date Metering Currently in effect Monthly Billing Currently in effect Leak Detection and Repair Currently in effect Conservation Rate Structure Currently in effect Odd/Even Sprinkling Ban Currently in effect Water Emergency Ordinance Currently in effect Monthly Billing Inserts Currently in effect Watering Ban During Peak Hours Currently in effect Public Service Announcements Currently in effect City Hall rainwater harvesting system Currently in effect Greater Utilization of Website Proposed/2018 Greater Utilization of Social media Proposed/2018 Voluntary Water Audits Proposed/2018 Study use of Pressure reducing valves in high pressure areas Proposed/2018 Creating separate billing structures for commercial and industrial Currently in effect customers Requiring separate irrigation meters Currently in effect Study plausibility of using recycled water for industrial purposes Proposed/TBD Study plausibility of using stormwater for ball field irrigation Proposed/2018